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When playing around with exceptions in C++, I noticed a curious behaviour that I was hoping someone here could explain. Look at the code below:

class Foo
{
public:

    Foo()
    {
        throw 0;
    }
};

class RandomException
{
public:

    Foo f;
};

void bar()
{
    throw RandomException();
}

// Case #1
int main()
{
    bar();
    return 0;
}

In the case above, I have an unhandled exception. Now if I change the body of the main function to:

// Case #2
int main()
{
    try
    {
        bar();
    }
    catch (int)
    {
    }

    return 0;
}

I'm swallowing the exception. There are no unhandled exceptions, and the code runs fine. And if I change the code to:

// Case #3
int main()
{
    try
    {
        bar();
    }
    catch (RandomException&)
    {
    }

    return 0;
}

Now I have an unhandled exception again.

I want to know why in case Case #2 I have no unhandled exceptions, and in Case #3 I do, even though in both cases I'm throwing 2 exceptions, one int and one of type RandomException.

How does C++ handle things when an exception is thrown while throwing an exception?

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1  
why would you throw an exception inside of a custom exception class? That's insane. The constructor of RandomException calls the constructor of Foo which throws and you only catch that exception in case 2, not case 3. –  stefan Mar 22 '13 at 13:16
    
You end up in The Daily WTF. 8v) –  Fred Larson Mar 22 '13 at 13:18
    
@stefan For science, of course. Why else? –  Zeenobit Mar 22 '13 at 13:19
1  
@stefan Any exception type that uses e.g. std::string exposes itself to throwing std::bad_alloc or some such at construction time. std::runtime_error would be an example. –  Luc Danton Mar 22 '13 at 13:57
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1 Answer

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Here, the construction of the RandomException object fails with an exception, so throw RandomException() is never completed and an int (0) is thrown (in the process of constructing RandomException).

If you have a handler for that (as in case #2), control will be transferred to that handler. If not (as in case #3), std::terminate() will be invoked.

share|improve this answer
    
So because the construction of RandomException is never "completed", it never gets thrown? –  Zeenobit Mar 22 '13 at 13:20
    
@Zeenobit: Indeed, that's what is happening. –  Andy Prowl Mar 22 '13 at 13:29
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