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I have class called Bar, and in this class Bar there is an object of type Foo (a class). Class Bar takes 3 parameters, x, y and z. Foo takes 2 parameters, y and z.

currently I'm doing this:

class Bar {
 public:
  Bar(int x, int y, int z) { 
      foo = new Foo(y, z);
      do something with x;
  }

 private:
  Foo * foo;
};

I remember seeing in a book another way to do this using a colon but I don't remember how exactly.

What is the standard or usual way of doing something like this?

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Foo is a container class and contains a vector of type myClass. When I do this I now get the error: 1>c:\program files (x86)\microsoft visual studio 11.0\vc\include\vector(1541): error C2036: 'myClass *' : unknown size It compiled and ran fine when I did it using dynamic allocation. –  jazzybazz Mar 22 '13 at 13:44
    
Can you post your actual code? –  hmjd Mar 22 '13 at 13:48
    
Are you forward-declaring the class? You can do that for pointers and references, but the compiler needs the full definition (read: header) for a plain member. –  sje397 Mar 22 '13 at 13:50

3 Answers 3

Use an initializer list and avoid dynamic allocation:

class Bar {
public:
    Bar(int x, int y, int z) : foo(y, z) {}
private:
    Foo foo;
};
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class Bar {
 public:
  Bar(int x, int y, int z) : foo(y, z) { 
      do something with x;
  }

 private:
  Foo foo;
};
share|improve this answer

your perplexing line should be

... 
Bar(int x, int y, int z) : foo(new Foo(y,z)) { 
... 
private: 
Foo* foo; 
...

i see other answers dont use pointer. But correct one should be this.

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3  
If by "correct" you mean "preserving the unnecessary dynamic allocation and memory leak", then you're right. Personally, I prefer the answers that recommended avoiding dynamic allocation. –  Mike Seymour Mar 22 '13 at 13:48
    
I tried to stick to the original question. I saw a pointer type Foo then used a pointer initialization because we dont know the internal structure of Foo. Maybe there are link lists and the user want to do foo = foo->next; in somewhere.Besides it is good to learn preferring non-pointer objects is a common practice. –  Fredrick Gauss Mar 22 '13 at 14:02
2  
@FredrickGauss Yes, they're pretty dangerous really. If you want some good info, look up 'RAII'. –  sje397 Mar 22 '13 at 14:14
    
Then we can handle it using smart pointers. –  Fredrick Gauss Mar 30 '13 at 9:10

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