Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This is my first question on StackOverflow, so I'll try to format it the right way.

Basically, I have a div with a border and an outline. On hover, the div also gets a shadow, which, of course, should be outside of the outline. This goes well in all browsers, except for firefox. Firefox seems to render the outline outside of the box-shadow for some reason. An example can be seen here: http://rubencoolen.be/test.php

This is my CSS:

.block {

    background: #eceeeb;
    border: 3px solid white;
    outline: 2px solid lavender;
    width: 240px;
    padding: 10px;
    float: left;
    height: 130px;
    margin: 40px;
    text-align: center;
    cursor: default;
    -moz-transition: background 0.7s, -moz-box-shadow 0.3s;
    -webkit-transition: background 0.7s, -webkit-box-shadow 0.3s;
    -o-transition: background 0.7s;
    transition: background 0.7s, box-shadow 0.3s;

}

.block:hover {

    background: whitesmoke;
    -webkit-box-shadow: 0px 0px 18px rgba(50, 50, 50, 0.30);
    -moz-box-shadow: 0px 0px 18px rgba(50, 50, 50, 0.30);
    box-shadow: 0px 0px 18px rgba(50, 50, 50, 0.30);

}

I can't seem to find the right way of tackling this issue.

Please excuse my moderate English, it's not my main language.

share|improve this question
2  
outline is normally used to show focus on an element, firefox is outlining the entire element which would include the box-shadow. I suggest avoiding outline because the default behavior varies across browsers. –  Jake Zeitz Mar 22 '13 at 13:57
    
Thank you for your comment. Is there any way to mimic the looks of outline? As it really gives an extra to the design in this case. –  Ruben Coolen Mar 22 '13 at 14:10
    
actually, you could try playing with outline-offset to see if that has any effect. try adding outline-offset: 0px; –  Jake Zeitz Mar 22 '13 at 14:21
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can just nest divs to give the same effect as an outline:

<div class='outline'>
    <div class="block">Test</div>
</div>

And then add change the css:

.block {
    position:absolute;
    top:0px;
    left:0px;
    background: #eceeeb;
    border: 3px solid white;
    width: 234px;
    padding: 10px;
    float: left;
    height: 124px;
    text-align: center;
    cursor: default;
    -moz-transition: background 0.7s, -moz-box-shadow 0.3s;
    -webkit-transition: background 0.7s, -webkit-box-shadow 0.3s;
    -o-transition: background 0.7s;
    transition: background 0.7s, box-shadow 0.3s;
}

.outline {
    position:relative;
    border: 2px solid lavender;
    width: 240px;
    padding: 10px;
    float: left;
    height: 130px;
    margin: 40px;
}

This works in both latest versions of Chrome and Firefox

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. I ended up using this for 2 projects. –  Ruben Coolen Apr 2 '13 at 14:59
    
Glad it worked out for you. –  Pow-Ian Apr 2 '13 at 15:34
add comment

As others have stated in the comments, you're not really using outline for it's intended purposes -- it's not meant to be treated just as an additional border in case the standard one isn't good enough for you; it has it's own reason for existing, and its own semantics. I'd suggest not using it this way at all.

So you asked what you could use instead?

  • border-image:

    Recent browsers all support a feature called border-image, which allows you to define the look of the border pretty much as you want to. You can specify any images you want in the borders, and thus you can design the border to look the way you have it (or even a lot more complex), without needing to resort to the outline style at all.

    The down-side is that IE doesn't support it (not even IE10), so you'll need to fall back on your outline solution for that. But you could use something like Modernizr to do feature detection for border-image, and only fall back to outline if border-image isn't supported.

  • :before or :after with a border.

    The :before and :after pseudo-selectors allow you to create an additional element before an after a given element using just CSS.

    You could use either of these to create an element with a border which would solve the problem for you, again without needing to use an outline or any additional markup.

Hope that helps.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks alot. Both you and Pow-Ian's answers are very useful. I ended up using Ian's method though, so I selected his one to be the answer. –  Ruben Coolen Apr 2 '13 at 14:57
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.