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I want go through all combinations of values in array by incrementing it backwards.
So let's have an array

    int array[10] = {0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0};

I want to increment it this way: {0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1} > {0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,2}...{p-1,p-1,p-1,p-1,p-1,p-1,p-1,p-1,p-1,p-1}.

For examples smaller array, p=3 : {0,0,0}>{0,0,1}>{0,0,2}>{0,1,0}>{0,1,1}>{0,1,2}...{2,2,2}

Array can be sizeof(int)*m big, where 1<=m<=10.

Can someone help me out with algorithm for that?

EDIT: Sorry, forgot about this..
Ok sorry for confusion but I have one more condition..

That array won't be in that form. It will be something like this example

    int array[10] = {0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0};
    int help[10] = {3,4,0,1,0,0,3,0,1,0};

and i want to get combination of values in array[help[]!=0], in this case array[0],array[1],array[3],array[6],array[8] so ->

    int array[10] = {0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0};
    int array[10] = {0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,0};
    int array[10] = {0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,2,0};
    int array[10] = {0,0,0,0,0,0,1,0,0,0};
    int array[10] = {0,0,0,0,0,0,1,0,1,0};
    int array[10] = {2,2,0,2,0,0,2,0,2,0};     

p=3
Something like that for() cycle will go i=0,1,3,6,8, where the values are i=help[i]!=0.

share|improve this question
    
I'm not sure I understand, so you're representing numbers in base 4? – Benjamin Gruenbaum Mar 22 '13 at 13:57
1  
Essentially representing the number in base(p) + 1. You need to show an attempt at your algorithm before asking for help. – TonyArra Mar 22 '13 at 13:58
    
yes, it should've been in base(p) but made a mistake there:) gonna correct it – user2199158 Mar 22 '13 at 14:00
    
If you know how to add 1 to a multi-digit number, you already know how to do this. – David Schwartz Mar 22 '13 at 14:01
    
It's not necessary to set each value to 0 by the way, you can just use = {0}; to set them all. – teppic Mar 22 '13 at 14:06
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Here is an example:

void increment(int array[], size_t size, int limit)
{
     do
     {
         if (++array[--size] != limit)
         {
             break;
         }
         array[size] = 0; // value overflow
     }
     while (size);
}

Usage:

int array[10];
memset(array, 0, sizeof(array));

increment(array, 10, 3);

Edit: algorithm with filter

void increment(int array[], int filter[], size_t size, int limit)
{
     do
     {
         if (!filter[--size])
         {
             // skip this position
             continue;
         }
         if (++array[size] != limit)
         {
             break;
         }
         array[size] = 0; // value overflow
     }
     while (size);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for this, its helpful, but I had to edit the question, really appriciate your answer! – user2199158 Mar 22 '13 at 14:19
    
Shouldn't it be if (++array[--size] != limit) instead of if (++array[size] != limit) ? – user2199158 Mar 22 '13 at 14:34
    
@user2199158 I use C indexes in the algorithm, which are 0-based. So the first statement in the loop makes index correct. I.e. if array size is 10, indexes are [0..9]. If you have different indexing scheme, adapt as needed. Just make sure the index value is correct before the first use. – Valeri Atamaniouk Mar 22 '13 at 14:38
    
yea i know but isn't it testing if (++array[10]!= limit) ? – user2199158 Mar 22 '13 at 14:43
    
Oh you decremented it in if (!filter[--size]) ... sorry:) – user2199158 Mar 22 '13 at 14:44

I see that the question has changed a bit, from incrementing an array backwards to adding one to a base(n) number... that's a different problem.

int base = 3;

for( int i = (sizeof( array ) / sizeof( array[0] ))-1; i >= 0; )
{
    if( ++array[i] < base )
        break;
    else
        array[i--] = 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
If you want to assume that the array does not contain pre-initialized values, yes. – K Scott Piel Mar 22 '13 at 14:03
    
If the array is pre-initialized, you would be overwriting the value if the array[i-1] element with 0 explicitly. On the other hand, if you're adding 1 to a number that already has a value, you would "break" the initial value by assigning 0 to it. – K Scott Piel Mar 22 '13 at 14:05
    
Edited to correct for changed question – K Scott Piel Mar 22 '13 at 14:14

this is equivalent to simply incrementing through the natural numbers, from 0 to (p+1) ^ arrayLength, in base p+1.

so for your example,

for (long i=0; i<4^10; i++)
{
   convert i to string in base (p+1), left- padding with 0s
   convert characters in string to comma separated array format and print 
}
share|improve this answer

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