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How can I detect whether an iOS device has push notifications capability or not?

[[UIApplication sharedApplication] enabledRemoteNotificationTypes] tells what permissions the user has given. I'm trying to figure out what capabilities the device has.

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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

According to Apple, push notifications was introduced in iOS 3.0.

That means that all i-devices which run iOS 3.0 or newer have that capability.

Both iPhone, iPod Touch, and iPad, support the system because as others have noted, this is an OS feature, not a hardware feature.

So check if iOS is 3.0 or newer, or perhaps your software is targetting newer devices anyway, in which case you don't even have to check.

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All iOS Devices have Push Notifications as capability.

  • iPad
  • iPhone
  • iPod Touch

This only relies on OS version and user settings. Not on hardware itself.

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If it relies on the OS version, doesn't that imply that there might be some old versions that doesn't have the capability? –  Lasse V. Karlsen Mar 22 '13 at 14:32
    
Well iOS <acoupleofyearsago> i should not be used anymore. all devices that exist can run an OS version that has APNS –  mr.VVoo Mar 22 '13 at 14:34
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From the Apple Doc. you have no need to call a method to figure it out.

Apple Push Notification service (APNs for short) is the centerpiece of the push notifications >feature. It is a robust and highly efficient service for propagating information to devices >such as iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch devices.

http://developer.apple.com/library/mac/#documentation/NetworkingInternet/Conceptual/RemoteNotificationsPG/ApplePushService/ApplePushService.html

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