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I'm using csv.DictReader() to read in a file. It actually returns a list of dictionaries, rather than a single dictionary. How can I force it to return a single dictionary or how can I merge the list of dictionaries it returns?

def agilent_e8361c_pna_read(file_loc):
    '''
    Load the '.s2p' file in to a dictionary.
    '''

    with open(file_loc) as f:
        # define the fields in the Agilent '.s2p' file
        col_names = ["f","s11","arg_s11","s21","arg_s21","s12","arg_s12","s22","arg_s22"]

        # read the data into a dictionary
        s2p_dicts = csv.DictReader(itertools.ifilter(n_input.is_comment, f), fieldnames=col_names, delimiter=' ')

    return s2p_dict

Ideally, the data would be initially read into a single dictionary and never need to be merged. It is a set of data. The columns belong together and are nonsense without the full set or a coherent subset. If DictReader isn't "pythonically" capable of this feat, I'll settle on just merging the list of dictionaries. This shouldn't be an uncommon thing that scientists and programmers alike want to do with a dataset.

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1  
Why would it return a single dictionary? It returns a dictionary for each row in the input file, that is what it is meant to do. –  Martijn Pieters Mar 22 '13 at 14:21
    
If you input file contains just one row, just select that one row: return next(s2p_dict). –  Martijn Pieters Mar 22 '13 at 14:23
    
If it contains more than one row, how did you expect the data would be mapped to keys of the dictionary? –  Martijn Pieters Mar 22 '13 at 14:24
    
@MartijnPieters It sounds like you have your own very strong opinions about what I'd like to do here that doesn't match what I've stated. Very clearly, I am reading a file in containing columns of data. They are all part of one data set and so they should be contained within one dictionary. –  nick_name Mar 22 '13 at 14:32
    
Then please elaborate on how you'd like to see the dictionaries merged. What are the keys, what should the values be? –  Martijn Pieters Mar 22 '13 at 14:33

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you want a dict of key:listOfValues you could do something like this:

def transposeDict(listOfDicts):
    """Turn a list of dicts into a dict of lists.  Assumes all dicts in the list have the exact same keys."""

    keys = listOfDicts[0].iterkeys()
    return dict((key, [d[key] for d in listOfDicts]) for key in keys)

Alternatively, in python2.7 or later:

def transposeDict(listOfDicts):
    """Turn a list of dicts into a dict of lists.  Assumes all dicts in the list have the exact same keys."""

    keys = listOfDicts[0].iterkeys()
    return {key: [d[key] for d in listOfDicts] for key in keys}

Of course, this assumes that all dicts within the list have the exact same keys - which they will from a DictReader.

In general, if that isn't the case, you need to do something like

from collections import defaultdict

def transposeListOfDicts(listOfDicts):
    """Turn a list of dict into a dict of lists"""

    result = defaultdict(list)

    for d in listofDicts:
        for key, value in d.iteritems():
            result[key].append(item)

    return result

If you want placeholders for missing values, then it looks like this:

def transposeListOfDicts(listOfDicts):
    keys = {}
    for d in listOfDicts:
        keys.update(d.iterkeys())

    return {key: [d.get(key, None) for d in listOfDicts] for key in keys}
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This is a very nice answer. Thanks for taking your time to post it! –  nick_name Mar 22 '13 at 14:57
    
I perhaps got a little bored at work... –  RoadieRich Mar 22 '13 at 14:57

DictReader takes each row a regular csv.reader() would return and turns that into a dictionary based on the fieldnames you passed in or read from the first row. This is by design.

If your input file contains just one row, return that by calling next() on the reader:

def agilent_e8361c_pna_read(file_loc):
    with open(file_loc) as f:
        col_names = ["f","s11","arg_s11","s21","arg_s21","s12","arg_s12","s22","arg_s22"]

        reader = csv.DictReader(itertools.ifilter(n_input.is_comment, f), fieldnames=col_names, delimiter=' ')
        return next(reader)

Do note that the next() call should be within the while block, otherwise the file will be closed before you could read from it.

If you need the rows merged into one dictionary, you need to state how you want to see the data merged. You can easily merged the rows into lists per key:

import csv

def agilent_e8361c_pna_read(file_loc):
    with open(file_loc) as f:
        col_names = ["f","s11","arg_s11","s21","arg_s21","s12","arg_s12","s22","arg_s22"]
        result = {k: [] for k in col_names}

        reader = csv.reader(itertools.ifilter(n_input.is_comment, f), fieldnames=col_names, delimiter=' ')
        for row in reader:
            for k, v in zip(col_names, row):
                result[k].append(v)

        return result

We don't need a DictReader anymore at that point, as we are not building a dictionary per row here.

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Okay, here is the most elegant solution incase anyone ever has this problem.

def agilent_e8361c_pna_read(file_loc):
    '''
    Load the '.s2p file in to a dictionary.
    '''

    with open(file_loc) as f:
        # read the data into a dictionary
        rows = csv.reader(itertools.ifilter(n_input.is_comment, f), delimiter=' ')

        # transpose data
        cols = transpose(rows)

        # create a dictionary with intuitive key names
        col_names = ["f","s11","arg_s11","s21","arg_s21","s12","arg_s12","s22","arg_s22"]
        s2p_dict = dict(zip(col_names,cols))

    return s2p_dict

def transpose(l):
    return map(list, zip(*l))
share|improve this answer
    
There's no guarantee that the items in a dict are always returned in the same order (see docs.python.org/2/library/stdtypes.html#dict.items), so you could see columns getting mixed up. Also, the comment "convert list of lists into a dictionary" is inaccurate, as rows is not a list of lists, and the return value of transpose() is a list, not a dict. –  RoadieRich Mar 22 '13 at 15:31
    
@RoadieRich You're right--that comment was defunct. So you basically would never want to use a dictionary to store ordered pairs? –  nick_name Mar 22 '13 at 15:41
    
@RoadieRich Actually, the order will NOT change if all you do is iteration. –  nick_name Mar 22 '13 at 15:44
    
No it won't, but it's bad practice to rely on a behavior that doesn't apply in every case. There is an ordereddict that makes some guarantees, but its update semantics isn't always what you want. A dictionary is intended to let you look up a value, given a key. The key can be thought of a lot like a variable name: if your key is a part of a data point, you're probably misusing it. For ordered pairs, consider using a list of tuples, or a list of a custom class. –  RoadieRich Mar 22 '13 at 15:48
    
Also, you can't guarantee that you're just iterating here: you don't know what csv.reader is doing with dicts before returning them - or that the "order" you recieve them in will match the columns You just got lucky in this case. –  RoadieRich Mar 22 '13 at 15:55

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