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I'm not able to figure out why Valgrind is printing Invalid read of size 8 when using wchar_t. I'm running a 64bit Ubuntu (3.5.0-25) system with valgrind-3.7.0 and gcc 4.7.2.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <wchar.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

int main()
{
    // const wchar_t *text = L"This is a t"; // no Valgrind error
    // const wchar_t *text = L"This is a teeeeeeee"; // no Valgrind error
    const wchar_t *text = L"This is a test"; // Valgrind ERRROR

    wchar_t *new_text = NULL;

    new_text = (wchar_t*) malloc( (wcslen(text) + 1) * sizeof(wchar_t));
    wcsncpy(new_text, text, wcslen(text));
    new_text[wcslen(text)] = L'\0';

    printf("new_text: %ls\n", new_text);

    free(new_text);

    return 0;
}

Compile:

$ gcc -g -std=c99 test.c -o test
$ valgrind --tool=memcheck --leak-check=full --track-origins=yes --show-reachable=yes ./test

Valgrind results:

==19495== Memcheck, a memory error detector
==19495== Copyright (C) 2002-2011, and GNU GPL'd, by Julian Seward et al.
==19495== Using Valgrind-3.7.0 and LibVEX; rerun with -h for copyright info
==19495== Command: ./test
==19495== 
==19495== Invalid read of size 8
==19495==    at 0x4ED45A7: wcslen (wcslen.S:55)
==19495==    by 0x4ED5C0E: wcsrtombs (wcsrtombs.c:74)
==19495==    by 0x4E7D160: vfprintf (vfprintf.c:1630)
==19495==    by 0x4E858D8: printf (printf.c:35)
==19495==    by 0x4006CC: main (test.c:16)
==19495==  Address 0x51f1078 is 56 bytes inside a block of size 60 alloc'd
==19495==    at 0x4C2B3F8: malloc (in /usr/lib/valgrind/vgpreload_memcheck-amd64-linux.so)
==19495==    by 0x40066F: main (test.c:12)
==19495== 
new_text: This is a test
==19495== 
==19495== HEAP SUMMARY:
==19495==     in use at exit: 0 bytes in 0 blocks
==19495==   total heap usage: 1 allocs, 1 frees, 60 bytes allocated
==19495== 
==19495== All heap blocks were freed -- no leaks are possible
==19495== 
==19495== For counts of detected and suppressed errors, rerun with: -v
==19495== ERROR SUMMARY: 1 errors from 1 contexts (suppressed: 2 from 2)

Now if I run the same but with a 'working string', let's say

const wchar_t *text = L"This is a t"; // no Valgrind error
// const wchar_t *text = L"This is a teeeeeeee"; // no Valgrind error
// const wchar_t *text = L"This is a test"; // Valgrind ERRROR

I get no issue:

==19571== Memcheck, a memory error detector
==19571== Copyright (C) 2002-2011, and GNU GPL'd, by Julian Seward et al.
==19571== Using Valgrind-3.7.0 and LibVEX; rerun with -h for copyright info
==19571== Command: ./test
==19571== 
new_text: This is a t
==19571== 
==19571== HEAP SUMMARY:
==19571==     in use at exit: 0 bytes in 0 blocks
==19571==   total heap usage: 1 allocs, 1 frees, 48 bytes allocated
==19571== 
==19571== All heap blocks were freed -- no leaks are possible
==19571== 
==19571== For counts of detected and suppressed errors, rerun with: -v
==19571== ERROR SUMMARY: 0 errors from 0 contexts (suppressed: 2 from 2)

At first I thought the string size should be always be multiple of 8 (maybe some wcs read chunks of 8) but some cases failed, then I thought I'd have to append always 8 bytes for the NULL terminator ((wcslen(item) + 2) * sizeof(wchar_t)), it worked but that doesn't make any sense since sizeof(wchar_t) - in my system - is 4 bytes and should be enough to handle the L'\0' terminator.

I also read the glibc wcslen source code but nothing new. I'm now thinking of Valgrind issue. Do you guys could throw some light here? Does it worth to file a bug against Valgrind?

Thank you

share|improve this question
    
Perhaps a problem with valgrind, yes. I get no errors with version 3.8.1 with your code and the same gcc version. –  teppic Mar 22 '13 at 14:48
    
Change this new_text = (wchar_t*) malloc( (wcslen(text) + 1) * sizeof(wchar_t)); to become new_text = calloc(wcslen(text) + 1, sizeof(*new_text)); and retest. –  alk Mar 22 '13 at 14:59
    
As a side note - your code won't work if you use any non-ASCII characters in your strings. You ought to set the locale. –  teppic Mar 22 '13 at 15:17
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1 Answer

up vote 6 down vote accepted

This is probably caused by SSE optimisation of the wcslen function; see e.g. https://bugzilla.redhat.com/show_bug.cgi?id=798968 or https://bugs.archlinux.org/task/30643.

When optimising wcslen, it's faster to read multiple wide characters at a time and use vectorised instructions (SSE) to compare them to L'\0'. Unfortunately valgrind sees this as an uninitialised read - which it is, but it's harmless because the result of wcslen does not depend on the uninitialised value.

The fix is to update valgrind in the hope that a newer version will suppress the false positive.

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