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I have the following code in document.ready()

if ($("#site-master").length > 0) {

    setMinContentHeight();

    function setMinContentHeight() {

        // removed for clarity
    }
}

I simply check if the page is correct (#site-master), then call my minimum height function, however I'm getting the following error in firebug: ReferenceError: setMinContentHeight is not defined.

I'm no javascript expert, but how can this be? The function works if I move it outside of document.ready(). I have checked and the code inside the if statement is reached.

Also, is this the best way of achieving what I want?

Thanks in advance.

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1  
put your function above the call –  Jake Zeitz Mar 22 '13 at 14:48
1  
you should define that function before you use it –  obivandamme Mar 22 '13 at 14:48
2  
That's an invalid location for a function declaration. –  Bergi Mar 22 '13 at 14:48
1  
Your function is called before it is declared, which would not happen if you moved it to the global scope (ie outside document.ready()) –  darma Mar 22 '13 at 14:48
3  
It's invalid to have function declaration in blocks which are not function declaration blocs. Different browsers handle that case differently. –  dystroy Mar 22 '13 at 14:48

5 Answers 5

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Never declare your functions inside if or for statements:

function setMinContentHeight() {
    // removed for clarity
}

if ($("#site-master").length > 0) {
    setMinContentHeight();
}

If we address the ECMAScript specification, according to Chapter 12, if clause is considered to be a Statement (as well as for, while, with, try/catch, etc).

Hence, following the NOTE from Semantics section:

Several widely used implementations of ECMAScript are known to support the use of FunctionDeclaration as a Statement. However there are significant and irreconcilable variations among the implementations in the semantics applied to such FunctionDeclarations. Because of these irreconcilable differences, the use of a FunctionDeclaration as a Statement results in code that is not reliably portable among implementations. It is recommended that ECMAScript implementations either disallow this usage of FunctionDeclaration or issue a warning when such a usage is encountered. Future editions of ECMAScript may define alternative portable means for declaring functions in a Statement context.

It means that we cannot guarantee the consistent behavior in such cases, and, as a result, we will always get exception in strict mode in case if function was declared inside the statement.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 because so many bad answers here... –  dystroy Mar 22 '13 at 14:52
    
@dystroy Is it the best of the worst? :) –  VisioN Mar 22 '13 at 14:53
    
No, it's right. You could precise that browsers handle function declared in conditioned blocks in different ways. And an ecmascript reference would probably bring more rep. –  dystroy Mar 22 '13 at 14:54
    
@dystroy: It's not explicitly mentioned in the spec. You can just point to the production of SourceElement –  Bergi Mar 22 '13 at 15:03
1  
@Bergi Well, there is some sort of note in Chapter 12. I have added the note to the answer. –  VisioN Mar 22 '13 at 15:17
if ($("#site-master").length > 0) {
    setMinContentHeight();
}
function setMinContentHeight() {
        // removed for clarity
}

You need to declare your function in the global scope.

share|improve this answer
6  
No, not the global scope : just at the root level of the scope, which might be a function. –  dystroy Mar 22 '13 at 14:50

First, read on the difference between var functionName = function() {} and function functionName() {} to understand function declarations vs expressions. Now what do you have? Nothing of the two, since function declarations need to be on the top level of function/script code - nesting them in blocks is not allowed. It's called a function statement, is nonstandard and working differently.

Put it outside the if-block:

// here
if ($("#site-master").length > 0) {
    setMinContentHeight();
}
// or here:
function setMinContentHeight() {
    …
}
share|improve this answer

Place the call after you've defined the function and don't define functions inside an if block:

function setMinContentHeight() {
    // removed for clarity
}

if ($("#site-master").length > 0) {
    setMinContentHeight();
}
share|improve this answer

Maybe you have problems with browser compatibility, but it works like this:

right:

n();
function n(){ alert('1'); }

wrong:

n();
var n = function(){ alert('1'); }
share|improve this answer
    
No : that's only valid at the root level of the scope, not in an inner conditionned scope. –  dystroy Mar 22 '13 at 14:52
    
Can you show me when it's not valid? –  karaxuna Mar 22 '13 at 14:56
    
@dystroy this works too: if(true){ n(); function n(){alert('1');} } –  karaxuna Mar 22 '13 at 15:03
    
Please read the links Bergi provides : kangax.github.com/nfe/#function-declarations-in-blocks –  dystroy Mar 22 '13 at 15:06
    
@dystroy thanks, I have learned something new. But in question code everything should work –  karaxuna Mar 22 '13 at 16:02

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