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I've written an asynchronous job queue class which has been working nicely for ages. It uses a std::vector as the underlying collection to keep jobs in and then processes them later as you might expect. When I add a job it does a push_back on this vector.

Recently I decided that I wanted to templatize the underlying collection type that it uses and the with way I've written it, this should be very simple. It's now declared thus:

template<typename J, typename CollectionT = std::vector<J>>
class async_jobqueue
{
public:

There's just one snag, for vectorish type containers I want to push things onto the end of the collection and call push_back, for settish type containers I'll want to call insert. How can I make a compile decision about which to call? Or is there a handy adapter I can use?

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1  
Check this out: stackoverflow.com/questions/257288/…. It blew my mind when I read it. –  SirPentor Mar 22 '13 at 15:50
    
@SirPentor That's cool although it looks like that would give me a way of figuring it out at run time. –  Benj Mar 22 '13 at 15:52
    
Either use SFIANE(en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SFINAE) or specialize or template. –  phoeagon Mar 22 '13 at 15:52
    
@Benj You can use it in combination with std::enable_if or static_asset to do it at compile time. –  Joseph Mansfield Mar 22 '13 at 15:53
    
@Benj How are you deciding what is a vectorish or settish type of container? Do you mean a sequence container vs. associative container? –  Joseph Mansfield Mar 22 '13 at 15:54

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

How about the insert(iterator, value_type) overload and calling it with end()? It's available in both and should do what you want! Works on std::list as well!

There's really no need for type-dispatching here.

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Oh my, can't believe I didn't spot that insert can take an iterator... –  Benj Mar 22 '13 at 17:22

I would rather use an overloaded helper function. The one below relies on the fact that no Standard container exposes both a single-argument insert() function and a push_back() function:

#include <utility>

template<typename C, typename T>
auto insert_in_container(C& c, T&& t) ->
    decltype(c.push_back(std::forward<T>(t)), void())
{
    c.push_back(std::forward<T>(t));
}

template<typename C, typename T>
auto insert_in_container(C& c, T&& t) ->
    decltype(c.insert(std::forward<T>(t)), void())
{
    c.insert(std::forward<T>(t));
}

This is how you would use them:

#include <set>
#include <vector>
#include <iostream>

int main()
{
    std::set<int> s;
    std::vector<int> v;

    insert_in_container(s, 5);
    insert_in_container(v, 5);

    std::cout << s.size() << " " << v.size();
}

And here is a live example.

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Hmm, very cool, this looks like just the thing. –  Benj Mar 22 '13 at 16:00
    
Are you using is_same like that to induce SFINAE? –  0x499602D2 Mar 22 '13 at 16:05
    
@David: Yes, that's just a trick. There could be other ways of course –  Andy Prowl Mar 22 '13 at 16:06
    
Maybe you can use: -> decltype(c.insert(std::forward<T>(t)), void()) to cut down on code bloat. –  0x499602D2 Mar 22 '13 at 16:08
    
@David: Right, this is much cleaner, let me edit the answer. Thank you! –  Andy Prowl Mar 22 '13 at 16:09

Since concepts-lite should hopefully be popping up in time for C++14, I might as well show you how this will be done then:

template<typename J, typename CollectionT = std::vector<J>>
class async_jobqueue
{
  public:

    requires Associative_container<CollectionT>()
    void adding_function(const J& item) {
      // Uses insert
    }

    requires Sequence_container<CollectionT>()
    void adding_function(const J& item) {
      // Uses push_back
    }
};

Of course, this is not possible yet (and may never be). However, the reception to concepts-lite is pretty positive.

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+1, that's cool. Thank you for bringing it on –  Andy Prowl Mar 22 '13 at 16:06
    
Yes very, looks nice and clean. –  Benj Mar 22 '13 at 16:06

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