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def numPens(n):
    """
    n is a non-negative integer

    Returns True if some non-negative integer combination of 5, 8 and 24 equals n
    Otherwise returns False.
    """
    if n < 5:
        return False
    N = n
    while N >= 0:
        if  N % 24 == 0 or N % 8 == 0 or N % 5 == 0: # if N / 24 is equal to 0 then we can buy N pens
            return True
        if N < 5:
            return False    # if N < 5 we cannot buy any pens

        if  N > 24:         # if N is greater than 24 , take away 24 and continue loop
            N -= 24
        elif N > 8:         # if N is greater than 8, take away 8 and continue loop
            N -= 8
        else:
            N -= 5          # else take away 5 and continue loop

I had to create this function for a test, I am just wondering if the problem can be sorted recursively or what would be most efficient solution, I am new to programming so any help would be great, thanks.

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2  
Technically, since you are modifying the value of N towards zero and re-evaluating each time a modification is made, it already is recursive. You're simply not containing your evaluation in a function that calls itself. –  ecline6 Mar 22 '13 at 16:04
    
ok thanks, I have always associate recursion with a call to the function as that is the only way I have seen so far, is there a simpler way of accomplishing what I had to do? –  Padraic Cunningham Mar 22 '13 at 16:08
    
Yeah, it's helpful to remember too that ALL recursions are loops, whether explicitly written that way or not. –  ecline6 Mar 22 '13 at 16:10
    
@ecline6 It's misleading to suggest that this is already recursive. Generally speaking, when a recursive algorithm is converted into an iterative one there will be an explicit stack variable to keep track of the recursive state. The OP's algorithm has no stack. –  John Kugelman Mar 22 '13 at 16:14
1  
-1, I'm sorry. First of all, what you're doing here is not called "combination" but "composition". Then, your question's title "python algorithm" is by far too generic. Same for your tags. Please correct and improve your question and I will be pleased to undo my downvote. –  etuardu Mar 22 '13 at 16:15
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closed as too localized by Wooble, nneonneo, Al G, Burhan Khalid, talonmies Mar 22 '13 at 21:51

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6 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted
if  N % 24 == 0 or N % 8 == 0 or N % 5 == 0

If you get rid of the above modulus (%) checks then your algorithm is what's known as a greedy algorithm. It subtracts the largest number it can each iteration. As you might have noticed, the greedy algorithm doesn't work. It gives the wrong answer for 15 = 5 + 5 + 5, for example.

 15 (-8) --> 7 (-5) --> 2 --> False

By adding in the modulus checks you've improved the greedy algorithm because it now correctly handles 15. But it still has holes: for instance, 26 = 8 + 8 + 5 + 5.

 26 (-24) --> 2 --> False

In order to correctly solve this problem you must abandon the greedy approach. It's not always sufficient to subtract the largest number possible. To answer your question, yes, a recursive solution is called for here.

def numPens(n):
    """
    n is a non-negative integer

    Returns True if some non-negative integer combination of 5, 8 and 24 equals n
    Otherwise returns False.
    """
    # Base case: Negative numbers are by definition false.
    if n < 0:
        return False

    # Base case: 0 is true. It is formed by a combination of zero addends,
    # and zero is a non-negative integer.
    if n == 0:
        return True

    # General case: Try subtracting *each* of the possible numbers, not just
    # the largest one. No matter what n-x will always be smaller than n so
    # eventually we'll reach one of the base cases (either a negative number or 0).
    for x in (24, 8, 5):
        if numPens(n - x):
            return True

    return False

This is the most straightforward way to solve the problem and will work reasonably well for smallish numbers. For large numbers it will be slow due to the way it evaluates the same numbers multiple times. An optimization left to the reader is to use dynamic programming to eliminate duplicate calculations.

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Was just writing a comment to say that the Greedy Algorithm doesn't work here, using the example of 26, but you beat me to it. :) Anyway, this shows a clean, easy to understand recursive solution, so +1. It might run into trouble with the maximum recursion depth in Python in the real world, but that probably doesn't matter here. –  Mark Amery Mar 22 '13 at 16:17
    
the algorithm is not complete, numPens(0) return True. –  xjdrew Mar 22 '13 at 16:21
    
My code should have elif N > 8: not if I tried to edit but couldn't. Thanks for the input, your solution looks a lot better than mine :) –  Padraic Cunningham Mar 22 '13 at 16:23
    
would using if n < 5: return False and just using the for loop take care of negative ints and return False if n was equal to zero –  Padraic Cunningham Mar 22 '13 at 16:41
    
@PadraicCunningham According to your spec, 0 should return True. Read it carefully. That's why I coded it the way I did. –  John Kugelman Mar 22 '13 at 16:45
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There are more efficient (O(1)) algorithms.

For instance, you can add

if n > 40: 
    return True

as one of your base cases!

You can make it even more efficient, by maintaining a lookup table for the rest of the values (n < 40).

The reason you can do this is this: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coin_problem#n_.3D_2

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so simple but so effective, I think I need to brush up on my maths! :) –  Padraic Cunningham Mar 22 '13 at 17:12
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Obviously, it's a recursive problem, below is maybe the simplest code:

def numPens(n):
    if n < 5:
        return False
    elif n==5 or n==8 or n==24:
        return True
    else:
        return numPens(n-5) or numPens(n-8) or numPens(n-24)

if you need to be more efficient and robust, you can improve by yourself.

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Thanks, this works perfectly. –  Padraic Cunningham Mar 22 '13 at 16:46
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n=5a+8b+24c <=> n=5a+8(b+3c), hence you could have a function :

def numPens(n):
    if n < 5:
        return False
    if n % 8 == 0 or n % 5 == 0:
        return True
    else:
        return numPens(n-8) or numPens(n-5)
share|improve this answer
    
I would never have though of that thanks. –  Padraic Cunningham Mar 23 '13 at 18:39
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def numPens(n):
    global cantidad
    cantidad = cantidad + 1
    if n < 5:
        return False
    elif n%5==0 or n%8==0 or n%24==0:
        return True
    else:
        return numPens(n-5) or numPens(n-8) or numPens(n-24)
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thanks for the input. –  Padraic Cunningham Mar 23 '13 at 18:38
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An informal definition of recursion given at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Recursive defines recursion as: "Recursion is the process a procedure goes through when one of the steps of the procedure involves invoking the procedure itself." On the other hand iteration is defined as: "Iteration means the act of repeating a process with the aim of approaching a desired goal, target or result. Each repetition of the process is also called an "iteration," and the results of one iteration are used as the starting point for the next iteration." http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Itteration

As you can see the two processes are very similar. Any loop that is not infinite will be iterative, and could be written in a recursive manner, and any recursive call could be written as an iterative loop. However in many cases one method or the other is much easier to implement.

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