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What guidelines can be followed when deciding between if - else if - else and switch - case?

Some examples of equivalent couples of structures. Or are they?

int a;
#define const1 42
#define const2 666

if(a == const1){};

switch(a){  
    case const1: {} 
    break;  
}  

if(a == const1){}
else {}

switch(a){  
    case const1: {} 
    break;  

    default: {}
    break;
} 

if(a == const1){}
else if(a == const2){}
else {}

switch(a){  
    case const1: {} 
    break;  

    case const2: {} 
    break;  

    default: {}
    break;
} 

From here on, I think switch is definitely superior in terms of both readability and performance.

As a matter of fact, I am currently at the last situation, trying to decide which way to go.

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2  
it's break and not brake –  MOHAMED Mar 22 '13 at 16:13
1  
Generally when you have enums and want to check over them, you use switch case. The other case you have already described, too many else if conditions make the code less readable. –  noMAD Mar 22 '13 at 16:15
2  
What's efficient depends on many factors. Mostly on how smart the compiler is, what the target architecture can do, and how numerous and dense your constants are. –  Rhymoid Mar 22 '13 at 16:19
2  
There should be no performance difference at all on a good compiler. A good compiler will implement switch and if/else in whatever way has the best performance, regardless of which syntax you choose. –  Brendan Long Mar 22 '13 at 16:20
1  
@Brendan Long, excuse me for the overly broad question. However, my querry includes non-optimizing compilers, not to mention unknown hardware. Besides, readability is an important factor. –  Vorac Mar 22 '13 at 16:28
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1 Answer

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If they just involve evaluating a variable, testing it and executing a statement depending on that, there's no difference in the logic, and any decent compiler can see that.

I tried the same test (a check for 32) with an if and a switch, and gcc, even with all optimisation turned off generated:

For the if:

movl    a(%rip), %eax
cmpl    $32, %eax
jne .L2
movl    $1, %eax
jmp .L3

for the switch:

movl    a(%rip), %eax
cmpl    $32, %eax
jne .L6
movl    $1, %eax
jmp .L3

Of course, if you're going to test the same integer for lots of values, a switch is more readable -- that's what it's intended for.

share|improve this answer
    
There exist application, that are (unfortunately) constrained to -O0 ! –  Vorac Mar 22 '13 at 16:30
    
This was generated with -O0 –  teppic Mar 22 '13 at 16:31
1  
Which is probably why he said "With all optimisation [sic] turned off" –  Randy Howard Mar 22 '13 at 16:31
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