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I have to check each and every condition with this repetitive if else loop. How to simplify with for loop or any other method?

if(color.equals("1")&&id.equals("pant"))
{

}
else if(color.equals("2")&&id.equals("pant"))
{

}
else if(color.equals("3")&&id.equals("pant"))
{

}
else if(color.equals("4")&&id.equals("pant"))
{

}
else if(color.equals("5")&&id.equals("pant"))
{

}
else if(color.equals("6")&&id.equals("pant"))
{

}


if(color.equals("1")&&id.equals("shirt"))
{

}
else if(color.equals("2")&&id.equals("shirt"))
{

}
else if(color.equals("3")&&id.equals("shirt"))
{

}
else if(color.equals("4")&&id.equals("shirt"))
{

}
else if(color.equals("5")&&id.equals("shirt"))
{

}
else if(color.equals("6")&&id.equals("shirt"))
{

}
share|improve this question
6  
What's inside the if blocks? –  default locale Mar 22 '13 at 16:15
2  
If no generic action is taken you can not simplify this with a for loop –  Paranaix Mar 22 '13 at 16:16
2  
If you want to use a for loop it would mean that you want to do the SAME THING for when color equals 1, 2, ... 6. If this is the case then we'll need the answer to @defaultlocale 's question first. –  Sanchit Mar 22 '13 at 16:18
    
@defaultlocale some methods are called inside those conditions –  Ameer Mar 22 '13 at 16:19
1  
@Ameer as other commenters pointed out it's impossible to optimize the code without seeing it first. –  default locale Mar 22 '13 at 16:21

8 Answers 8

I would use the color-tag as an Integer-value-switch:

switch (color){
case 1:
if (id.equals("pant"){}
else if (id.equals("shirt"){}
break;
case 2:
if (id.equals("pant"){}
else if (id.equals("shirt"){}
break;
.
.
.}

easiest way imo.

share|improve this answer

You can use inner if statements to achieve a slightly simpler.

if (id.equals("pant")) {
    if (color.equals("1")) {
        //code
    }
    else if (color.equals("2")) {
        //code
    }
    //etc
}
else if (id.equals("shirt")) {
    if (color.equals("1")) {
        //code
    }
    else if (color.equals("2")) {
        //code
    }
    //etc
}

There may be ways to further simplify it, but we'd really need to know what is in the if blocks. For example, if you're just outputting the value, it could get really simple.

share|improve this answer

You could build a map that maps the combinations you are interested in to a function to perform.

Something like:

  interface Function {
    void f(); 
  }

  public void test() {
    String color = "1";
    String id = "pant";
    // Map the string to a function.
    Map<String,Function> functions = new HashMap<String,Function>();
    // As many of these as you have different processes.
    // You could name them too.
    functions.put("1|pant",new Function() {

      @Override
      public void f() {
        // What to do when we see color=1 id=pant
        System.out.println("1|pant");
      }

    });
    // Pull the function out of the map.
    Function f = functions.get(color+"|"+id);
    // If it was there.
    if ( f != null ) {
      // Do it.
      f.f();
    }
  }
share|improve this answer
switch (Integer.parseInt(color))
{
    case 1:
    if (id == "pant")
    {
        // 1:pant
    }
    else if (id == "shirt")
    {
        // 1:shirt
    }
    break;

    case 2:
    if (id == "pant")
    {
        // 2:pant
    }
    else if (id == "shirt")
    {
        // 2:shirt
    }
    break;

    // etc ...
}
share|improve this answer

If whats inside the braces is different you can't easily replace it with a for loop (we'd need to see whats inside the braces to be definitive). A switch statement would at least make things look nicer (assuming you use color as an int not a string of an int

if (id.equals("pant")){
    switch(color){ //note color should be an int, not a string of an int for this to work
         case 1:
              //whatevers in the braces
              break;
         case 2:
              //whatevers in the braces
              break;
           etc
         default:
              break;
    }     
}
share|improve this answer

What you can do, is to create an interface:

interface Do {
    whatever()
}

Along with a bunch of implementations for whatever you do inside the different if branches.

Then have a Map of Lists to store and find them:

Map<String, List<Do>> dos = new HashMap();
// put lots of Do implementations in Lists and put them in the map.

After the setup your if monster would be reduced to:

dos.get(id).get(color).whatever
share|improve this answer

You can use two for loops for this purpose, first get a list which contains two elements that is "shirts" and "pants" something like

string [2] cloths = {"pants","shirts"};   

and a variable like i and set that to 1 first

int i = 1;    

and then

for (string cloth : cloths)
{
    for (i = 1; i < 7 ; i++)
    {
        if(color.equals(i.toString())&&id.equals(cloth))
        {
            System.out.println(i.toString()+"&"+cloth);
        }
    }
}

The whole idea is like this but There maybe some minor syntax errors since I didn't compile the code

share|improve this answer
    
The thing that this will work if OP wants to do same things, but If they are different for different conditions then it wont. –  Smit Mar 22 '13 at 16:27
    
As you are saying if they want to do different things... so basically you need the if statements if they want to do different things! –  Ehsan Mar 22 '13 at 16:29

If you can create a common Command interface and encapsulate color & id into a Key class you can have a Map of <Key, Command> pairs.

public class Key {
    private final String color; // "6" as a color?  why not "blue"?
    private final String name;

    public Key(String color, String name) {
        this.color = color;
        this.name = name;
    }

    public String getColor() { return this.color; }
    public String getName() { return this.name; }
}

public interface Command {
    void execute(Object...args);
}

Map<Key, Command> noSwitch;
for (Key key : noSwitch.keyValues()) {
    noSwitch.get(key).execute();
}

Or, better yet, embed that behavior into a polymorphic StockItem class that knows what to do.

Yours looks like a brittle, non-object-oriented design. You can do better.

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