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Common sense and a sanity-check using gregexpr() indicate that the look-behind and look-ahead assertions below should each match at exactly one location in testString:

testString <- "text XX text"
BB  <- "(?<= XX )"
FF  <- "(?= XX )"

as.vector(gregexpr(BB, testString, perl=TRUE)[[1]])
# [1] 9
as.vector(gregexpr(FF, testString, perl=TRUE)[[1]][1])
# [1] 5

strsplit(), however, uses those match locations differently, splitting testString at one location when using the lookbehind assertion, but at two locations -- the second of which seems incorrect -- when using the lookahead assertion.

strsplit(testString, BB, perl=TRUE)
# [[1]]
# [1] "text XX " "text"    

strsplit(testString, FF, perl=TRUE)
# [[1]]
# [1] "text"    " "       "XX text"

I have two questions: (Q1) What's going on here? And (Q2) how can one get strsplit() to be better behaved?


Update: Theodore Lytras' excellent answer explains what's going on, and so addresses (Q1). My answer builds on his to identify a remedy, addressing (Q2).

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FYI, there's a somewhat related discussion about why stringr::str_split behaves differently to strsplit at github.com/hadley/stringr/pull/23 –  hadley Mar 23 '13 at 21:52
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3 Answers

up vote 12 down vote accepted

I am not sure whether this qualifies as a bug, because I believe this is expected behaviour based on the R documentation. From ?strsplit:

The algorithm applied to each input string is

repeat {
    if the string is empty
        break.
    if there is a match
        add the string to the left of the match to the output.
        remove the match and all to the left of it.
    else
        add the string to the output.
        break.
}

Note that this means that if there is a match at the beginning of a (non-empty) string, the first element of the output is ‘""’, but if there is a match at the end of the string, the output is the same as with the match removed.

The problem is that lookahead (and lookbehind) assertions are zero-length. So for example in this case:

FF <- "(?=funky)"
testString <- "take me to funky town"

gregexpr(FF,testString,perl=TRUE)
# [[1]]
# [1] 12
# attr(,"match.length")
# [1] 0
# attr(,"useBytes")
# [1] TRUE

strsplit(testString,FF,perl=TRUE)
# [[1]]
# [1] "take me to " "f"           "unky town" 

What happens is that the lonely lookahead (?=funky) matches at position 12. So the first split includes the string up to position 11 (left of the match), and it is removed from the string, together with the match, which -however- has zero length.

Now the remaining string is funky town, and the lookahead matches at position 1. However there's nothing to remove, because there's nothing at the left of the match, and the match itself has zero length. So the algorithm is stuck in an infinite loop. Apparently R resolves this by splitting a single character, which incidentally is the documented behaviour when strspliting with an empty regex (when argument split=""). After this the remaining string is unky town, which is returned as the last split since there's no match.

Lookbehinds are no problem, because each match is split and removed from the remaining string, so the algorithm is never stuck.

Admittedly this behaviour looks weird at first glance. Behaving otherwise however would violate the assumption of zero length for lookaheads. Given that the strsplit algorithm is documented, I belive this does not meet the definition of a bug.

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Yep, this sounds about right. Seems like an unfortunate way to avoid the infinite loop, but that does seem to be algorithm strsplit is following. Thanks! –  Josh O'Brien Mar 22 '13 at 20:43
    
(+1) wish I could vote more. Very, very nice answer! –  Arun Mar 23 '13 at 9:07
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Based on Theodore Lytras' careful explication of substr()'s behavior, a reasonably clean workaround is to prefix the to-be-matched lookahead assertion with a positive lookbehind assertion that matches any single character:

testString <- "take me to funky town"
FF2 <- "(?<=.)(?=funky)"
strsplit(testString, FF2, perl=TRUE)
# [[1]]
# [1] "take me to " "funky town" 
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1  
This is an excellent idea! –  Theodore Lytras Mar 22 '13 at 23:07
    
@TheodoreLytras -- Thanks! Based on your explanation, I knew before I tried it that it would work. –  Josh O'Brien Mar 23 '13 at 1:20
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Looks like a bug to me. This doesn't appear to just be related to spaces, specifically, but rather any lonely lookahead (positive or negative):

FF <- "(?=funky)"
testString <- "take me to funky town"
strsplit(testString,FF,perl=TRUE)
# [[1]]
# [1] "take me to " "f"           "unky town"  

FF <- "(?=funky)"
testString <- "funky take me to funky funky town"
strsplit(testString,FF,perl=TRUE)
# [[1]]
# [1] "f"                "unky take me to " "f"                "unky "           
# [5] "f"                "unky town"       


FF <- "(?!y)"
testString <- "xxxyxxxxxxx"
strsplit(testString,FF,perl=TRUE)
# [[1]]
# [1] "xxx"       "y"       "xxxxxxx"

Seems to work fine if given something to capture along with the zero-width assertion, such as:

FF <- " (?=XX )"
testString <- "text XX text"
strsplit(testString,FF,perl=TRUE)
# [[1]]
# [1] "text"    "XX text"

FF <- "(?= XX ) "
testString <- "text XX text"
strsplit(testString,FF,perl=TRUE)
# [[1]]
# [1] "text"    "XX text"

Perhaps something like that might function as a workaround.

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Howdy, fellow oRegonian ;) Thanks for better laying out the extent of the issue. Feels like a bug to me as well, and if I hear nothing else, I'll likely report it to the R-core team. (I've considered that workaround, but it actually ends up removing some characters. Plus, one shouldn't have to do something that ugly to get this to work!) –  Josh O'Brien Mar 22 '13 at 17:41
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