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I have a command line program in Python, that takes quite a while to finish. I want to know the exact time it takes to finish running.
I've looked at the timeit module, but it seems it's only for small snippets of code. I want to time the whole program.

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8 Answers

up vote 124 down vote accepted

The simplest way in python:

import time
start_time = time.time()
main()
print time.time() - start_time, "seconds"

This assumes that your program takes at least a tenth of second to run.

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6  
this calculates the real time though (including time used by other programs) so it will seem to take more time when your computer is busy doing other stuff –  newacct Oct 13 '09 at 1:23
4  
on Windows, do the same thing, but use time.clock() instead of time.time(). You will get slightly better accuracy. –  Corey Goldberg Oct 13 '09 at 14:02
3  
Paul's answer is better, see stackoverflow.com/questions/1557571/… –  sorin Jun 9 '10 at 14:32
13  
I had to add: 'import time' to get this to work. –  screechOwl Sep 23 '12 at 18:14
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I put this timing.py module into my own site-packages directory, and just insert import timing at the top of my module:

import atexit
from time import clock

def secondsToStr(t):
    return "%d:%02d:%02d.%03d" % \
        reduce(lambda ll,b : divmod(ll[0],b) + ll[1:],
            [(t*1000,),1000,60,60])

line = "="*40
def log(s, elapsed=None):
    print line
    print secondsToStr(clock()), '-', s
    if elapsed:
        print "Elapsed time:", elapsed
    print line
    print

def endlog():
    end = clock()
    elapsed = end-start
    log("End Program", secondsToStr(elapsed))

def now():
    return secondsToStr(clock())

start = clock()
atexit.register(endlog)
log("Start Program")

I can also call timing.log from within my program if there are significant stages within the program I want to show. But just including import timing will print the start and end times, and overall elapsed time. (Forgive my obscure secondsToStr function, it just formats a floating point number of seconds to hh:mm:ss.sss form.)

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2  
This is a real clean solution that also works if you press Ctrl-C to stop the program. –  sorin Jun 9 '10 at 14:31
    
Really nice solution and easy to integrate with existing code. Thanks! –  nover Feb 19 '13 at 21:25
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In Linux or UNIX:

time python yourprogram.py

In Windows, see this Stackoverflow discussion: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/673523/how-to-measure-execution-time-of-command-in-windows-command-line

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so if I am launching another widget, example in QT application how do we calculate time taken by that widget to show up ? –  san Dec 18 '13 at 16:47
    
For the widget case, if you are launching from a Python program, use the accepted answer by rogeriopvl. –  steveha Dec 18 '13 at 19:25
    
but that doesn't seem to give time in min:seconds it ends up a floating number !! –  san Dec 19 '13 at 5:48
    
Yes, it gives a number of seconds. You can convert to min:seconds if you want. Look at Paul McGuire's answer and its secondsToStr() function. –  steveha Dec 19 '13 at 6:48
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The solution of rogeriopvl works fine, but if you want more specific info you can use the python built-in profiler. Check this page:

http://docs.python.org/library/profile.html

a profiler tells you a lot of useful information like the time spent in every function

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Ahh that's brilliant!. Will be using this from now on –  Dominic Bou-Samra Oct 13 '09 at 0:14
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Even better for Linux: /usr/bin/time

$ /usr/bin/time -v python rhtest2.py

    Command being timed: "python rhtest2.py"
    User time (seconds): 4.13
    System time (seconds): 0.07
    Percent of CPU this job got: 91%
    Elapsed (wall clock) time (h:mm:ss or m:ss): 0:04.58
    Average shared text size (kbytes): 0
    Average unshared data size (kbytes): 0
    Average stack size (kbytes): 0
    Average total size (kbytes): 0
    Maximum resident set size (kbytes): 0
    Average resident set size (kbytes): 0
    Major (requiring I/O) page faults: 15
    Minor (reclaiming a frame) page faults: 5095
    Voluntary context switches: 27
    Involuntary context switches: 279
    Swaps: 0
    File system inputs: 0
    File system outputs: 0
    Socket messages sent: 0
    Socket messages received: 0
    Signals delivered: 0
    Page size (bytes): 4096
    Exit status: 0

Normally, just time is a simpler shell builtin that shadows the more capable /usr/bin/time.

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I really like Paul McGuire's answer, but I use Python3. So for those who are interested: here's a modification of his answer that works with Python 3 on *nix (I imagine, under Windows, that clock() should be used instead of time()):

#python3
import atexit
from time import time
from datetime import timedelta

def secondsToStr(t):
    return str(timedelta(seconds=t))

line = "="*40
def log(s, elapsed=None):
    print(line)
    print(secondsToStr(time()), '-', s)
    if elapsed:
        print("Elapsed time:", elapsed)
    print(line)
    print()

def endlog():
    end = time()
    elapsed = end-start
    log("End Program", secondsToStr(elapsed))

def now():
    return secondsToStr(time())

start = time()
atexit.register(endlog)
log("Start Program")

If you find this useful, you should still up-vote his answer instead of this one, as he did most of the work ;).

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start_time = time.clock()
main()
print time.clock() - start_time, "seconds"

time.clock() returns the processor time, which allows us to calculate only the time used by this process (on Unix anyway). The documentation says "in any case, this is the function to use for benchmarking Python or timing algorithms"

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2  
time.time() is best used on *nix. time.clock() is best used on Windows. –  Corey Goldberg Oct 13 '09 at 14:03
    
I believe this can not be used to calculate "only the time used by this process" because it uses system time and will be effected by other system processes? Correct me if I'm wrong about this :) –  Annan Jul 23 '13 at 10:49
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You can use the python profiler cProfile to measure CPU time and additionally how much time is spent inside each function and how many times each function is called. This is very useful if you want to improve performance of your script without knowing where to start. This answer to another SO question is pretty good. It's always good to have a look in the docs too.

Here's an example how to profile a script using cProfile from a command line:

$ python -m cProfile euler048.py

1007 function calls in 0.061 CPU seconds

Ordered by: standard name
ncalls  tottime  percall  cumtime  percall filename:lineno(function)
    1    0.000    0.000    0.061    0.061 <string>:1(<module>)
 1000    0.051    0.000    0.051    0.000 euler048.py:2(<lambda>)
    1    0.005    0.005    0.061    0.061 euler048.py:2(<module>)
    1    0.000    0.000    0.061    0.061 {execfile}
    1    0.002    0.002    0.053    0.053 {map}
    1    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 {method 'disable' of '_lsprof.Profiler objects}
    1    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 {range}
    1    0.003    0.003    0.003    0.003 {sum}
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