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There is an exception being generated by my code.

X = x * 10;
Y = y * 10;

if ((pow(X, 2))+(pow(Y, 2)) <= 27225 and ((pow(X, 2))+(pow(Y, 2)) >= 1225))

The user will enter values for x and y and if the values are not to low the program will continue. I have declared x and y as doubles above. There is code above this part, it is not the start.

I have this code as my other if function

if (((pow(X, 2))+(pow(Y, 2)) > 27225) or ((pow(X, 2))+(pow(Y, 2)) <1225))
{
      cout<<"\n\nThe values you have chosen for the centre points are to not compatible with our program. Please choose smaller values.";//new
      cout<<"\n\nIf you do not understand, please ask the programmer for further explanation.";
}

However, I cannot get the code to work at all, as in that the limits are not imposed, it just continues to run as normal even if the values are too large/small, can anyone tell me what I am doing wrong? Thanks

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2  
You can't get it to work, or you can't get it to compile? –  Will A Mar 22 '13 at 17:17
2  
This error message made my day. lol. cout<<"\n\nIf you do not understand, please ask the programmer for further explanation."; } –  Abraham Mar 22 '13 at 17:26
    
Uhm... In the second bit of code, how can pow(X,2) + pow(Y,2) be both greater than 27225 and less than 1225 at the same time? If the sum is 27226 you have true && false which is false, and if it's 1224 you have false && true which is false. In other words, this if will never trigger. Did you maybe mean to use || instead of &&? –  Nik Bougalis Mar 22 '13 at 17:48
    
Yeah sorry about that, stupidity there. Trying the 'if-else' function to try and fix the overall code. Thanks –  Rory Duncan Mar 22 '13 at 17:58

2 Answers 2

I think your first if condition should be checking if it is greater than 1225 AND less than 27225:

if ((pow(X, 2))+(pow(Y, 2)) <= 27225 && ((pow(X, 2))+(pow(Y, 2)) >= 1225))
//                              Here ^^

As you have it, the condition will be met for every possible value of X and Y; every number is either less than 27225 or greater than 1225.

For the second condition, just do else instead:

if ((pow(X, 2))+(pow(Y, 2)) <= 27225 && ((pow(X, 2))+(pow(Y, 2)) >= 1225)) {
  // Distance from origin is within range
} else {
  // Distance from origin is outside range
}

Note that or and and are not commonly used, as they are alternative tokens for || and &&. I would recommend sticking to || and && for consistency with most other developers.

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Okay, putting 'and' in instead makes the program restart if the values are too large, but it does not show the message I would like it to show with the second 'if' function. (Where if the values are too small/large the program will do something different) any ideas? And yeah, I know about 'or and 'and' but my version of XCode will not accept || or && so I have to make do. –  Rory Duncan Mar 22 '13 at 17:23
1  
Would you expand on how or and and are "not recommended"? By who? Why? –  Rapptz Mar 22 '13 at 17:29
2  
@Abraham: It's purely a matter of aesthetics, and irrelevant to the question. I've never heard of a C++ creator or a programmer advising for or against using the alternative tokens (apart from you and sfrabbit in this answer). –  Mike Seymour Mar 22 '13 at 17:40
2  
@Abraham: There is no reason to recommend against them. They are simply syntactic sugar. They are not even deprecated, which the Committee could well do if they wanted to. They are essentially irrelevant. –  Puppy Mar 22 '13 at 18:15
3  
@Abraham So, since you never saw them, then it means they're innapropriate? You better show some serious creds here, because I'm not really impressed right now. –  Etienne de Martel Mar 22 '13 at 18:16

From your coding, it doesn't look like you have defined the data type of X, Y. Instead of

X = x * 10;
Y = y * 10;

Instead, try

 int X = x * 10;
 intY = y * 10;


if (((pow(X, 2))+(pow(Y, 2)) > 27225)) {
  cout<<"\n\nThe values you have chosen for the centre points are to not  compatible   with our program. Please choose smaller values.";//new
}
else if( ((pow(X, 2))+(pow(Y, 2)) <1225))
{
        cout<<"\n\nIf you do not understand, please ask the programmer for further  explanation.";
}

This would give you the two different results as expected

share|improve this answer
    
okay...But I am trying to keep running code and calculations if the numbers are compatible. If they are not then the program displays the error message. If I put in your code, does it not mean that the program will never continue to run, as there are only two functions, both displaying error messages? –  Rory Duncan Mar 22 '13 at 17:34
1  
But the conditions are different. The first one runs when the result is > 27225 and the second one when the result is <1225. If you have another demand, add another "else if " and handle it. –  Abraham Mar 22 '13 at 17:39
    
Thanks again, will give it a go –  Rory Duncan Mar 22 '13 at 17:55

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