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This code,

lineCount = 1;
do{ //find the line count in the file
    c = fgetc(fp);
    if(c == '\n') lineCount++;
}
while(c != EOF);
fclose(fp);

counts 6 lines from this file

5 7 9 3 2 10 1 11 6 4 14 0 12 8 13 
3 4 10 8 0 12 13 2 7 1 9 5 6 14 11 
12 14 11 8 0 7 3 5 1 6 4 13 10 9 2 
14 11 13 0 2 12 9 3 5 7 1 6 8 4 10 
0 1 8 6 5 3 11 2 7 9 4 12 10 14 13 

and counts 5 lines from this file

39 47 37 30 7 38 17 49 11 1 29 41 25 19 10 45 23 0 32 15 2 9 4 6 21 40 20 24 5 31 34 3 33 48 44 27 14 26 28 35 16 42 46 36 12 8 22 13 18 43 
37 13 24 28 34 27 5 41 36 29 44 26 0 15 40 31 23 35 9 8 4 33 21 6 11 49 2 7 43 32 16 1 30 42 39 14 45 10 38 22 19 17 20 25 18 47 48 46 3 12 
0 49 26 20 14 12 10 3 9 23 15 37 5 32 4 42 25 46 38 45 40 19 22 1 39 29 7 41 33 13 30 35 11 6 18 31 21 28 24 36 16 43 27 34 44 17 2 8 47 48 
0 1 20 11 28 3 43 9 15 25 45 29 33 19 48 18 17 16 14 34 10 7 42 4 37 41 22 30 23 21 32 39 2 46 8 36 40 27 31 13 6 38 12 5 44 26 35 24 49 47 
15 30 18 7 34 25 43 14 38 48 40 9 33 26 28 27 21 0 20 10 47 8 11 32 12 5 36 4 46 42 6 29 13 31 23 17 39 35 19 49 24 41 44 16 37 45 2 1 22 3 

What would the reason be?

EDIT I created a file with 5 lines in Windows and 5 lines in Linux, Windows file counts 5 and Linux file counts 6. Why?

share|improve this question
    
Could it be windows style line endings? –  Jason Sperske Mar 22 '13 at 18:11
    
created a file and filled it by myself in linux, still counts 6. –  Varaquilex Mar 22 '13 at 18:11
2  
Make sure you don't have a new line after the end of your last line. You would start at 1 and add 1 at the end of each line. 6 –  climbage Mar 22 '13 at 18:13
    
I'm sure of it, there is absolutely no newline after the last entry. The format is "%d %d %d.....%d " (1 space after last element) and 4 new lines. –  Varaquilex Mar 22 '13 at 18:14
    
Did you open the file in binary mode? –  James McLaughlin Mar 22 '13 at 18:39

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You should verify that the two files actually only have four newline characters. In Linux, use the xxd command to dump the contents of your files in hexadecimal and then count the number of a characters (because newline characters are the letter 'a' in hex):

$ cat foo.txt
5 7 9 3 2 10 1 11 6 4 14 0 12 8 13
3 4 10 8 0 12 13 2 7 1 9 5 6 14 11
12 14 11 8 0 7 3 5 1 6 4 13 10 9 2
14 11 13 0 2 12 9 3 5 7 1 6 8 4 10
0 1 8 6 5 3 11 2 7 9 4 12 10 14 13
$ xxd -p foo.txt
352037203920332032203130203120313120362034203134203020313220
38203133200a332034203130203820302031322031332032203720312039
20352036203134203131200a313220313420313120382030203720332035
20312036203420313320313020392032200a313420313120313320302032
20313220392033203520372031203620382034203130200a302031203820
362035203320313120322037203920342031322031302031342031330a     <- note the 'a' at the end
$ xxd -p foo.txt | grep -o a | wc -l
5

You'll likely find that there are indeed five newline characters in your "6 line" file.

share|improve this answer
    
Counting 6 lines is not a problem but counting different lines in the same format 5 lined files is the problem. The problem is gone away when I start counting from 0 AND when I save the file in my linux platform (which means a text file created in windows should be saved again in linux in a text editor for getting the right amount of line counts). –  Varaquilex Mar 22 '13 at 19:10
    
@Volkanİlbeyli My point was that there are actually 5 newline characters in your Linux-saved file and only 4 newline characters in your Windows-saved file, and that you could use xxd to prove it. Starting your count at 0 or 1 doesn't change the fact that the files you create in Linux have 5 \n characters while the ones you create in Windows only have 4. Your assumption that "there is absolutely no newline after the last entry" is wrong and my answer gave you a way to prove it to yourself. Indeed, your fix is only masking the real problem and your understanding of what's really going on. –  Christopher Neylan Mar 22 '13 at 19:27
    
oh, now I understand your point. I'll let you know about the results when I get back to work. Thanks for the answer. –  Varaquilex Mar 22 '13 at 19:29

You start the count at 1 and increment for each newline encountered. If a file has one line—one string of non-newline characters followed by one newline—and then ends, you start the count at 1 and then increment it once, giving a line count of 2.

Perhaps want you want to do is start the count at 0, increment for each newline, and take note of any final non-newline-terminated-line? (That's a little bit harder.)

share|improve this answer
    
counting 6 lines is not the problem but counting different amounts is problem. see my other comments please. –  Varaquilex Mar 22 '13 at 19:19
    
I meant my second paragraph as a hint, but I will come right out and say it now in this comment: your files on Windows that have "five lines" actually have four lines, plus a fifth "partial" line (a line that is not terminated correctly). When you create the files on the Linux box the editor adds the final line terminator for you. –  torek Mar 23 '13 at 5:48

If test data were to be assumed to be the same as posted above and fp were to be opened as a text file:

I tested this on Linux and Windows. Both print 6(incorrect of-course because of the logic, which assumes that there is atleast 1 line)

gcc - 4.5.3

microsoft compiler cl for VS2010.

Also, linecount must start from 0 instead of 1.

share|improve this answer
    
The problem is not the logic. When I start counting from 0, 1st file counts 5 lines and 2nd file counts 4. Now THAT is the problem. Not the logic. –  Varaquilex Mar 22 '13 at 19:07

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