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I am calling a stored procedure that inserts data in to a sql server database from c#. I have a number of constraints on the table such as unique column etc. At present I have the following code:

try
{
   // inset data
}
catch (SqlException ex)
{
    if (ex.Message.ToLower().Contains("duplicate key"))
    {

        if (ex.Message.ToLower().Contains("url"))
        {
            return 1;
        }

        if (ex.Message.ToLower().Contains("email"))
        {
            return 2;
        }
    }

    return 3;
}

Is it better practise to check if column is unique etc before inserting the data in C#, or in store procedure or let an exception occur and handle like above? I am not a fan of the above but looking for best practise in this area.

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As an aside to this, if you do check. I would check on the ErrorCode as that will be more unique and less likely to change : msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa258747(v=sql.80).aspx –  Justin Pihony Mar 22 '13 at 18:47
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5 Answers

I view database constraints as a last resort kind of thing. (I.e. by all means they should be present in your schema as a backup way of maintaining data integrity.) But I'd say the data should really be valid before you try to save it in the database. If for no other reason, then because providing feedback about invalid input is a UI concern, and a data validity error really shouldn't bubble up and down the entire tier stack every single time.

Furthermore, there are many sorts of assertions you want to make about the shape of your data that can't be expressed using constraints easily. (E.g. state transitions of an order. "An order can only go to SHIPPED from PAID" or more complex scenarios.) That is, you'd need to use involving procedural-language based checks, ones that duplicate even more of your business logic, and then have those report some sort of error code as well, and include yet more complexity in your app just for the sake of doing all your data validation in the schema definition.

Validation is inherently hard to place in an app since it concerns both the UI and is coupled to the model schema, but I veer on the side of doing it near the UI.

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1  
I agree completely. A constraint error indicates a bug in your code - your code permitted the user to enter data that the database is rejecting. –  John Saunders Mar 22 '13 at 18:48
    
Is the code you're working on the only point of entry for the data the constraint references? If so, then absolutely rely on your code layer to define what values can be stored. The only reason I ask is because I've worked on legacy systems where there are multiple points of entry to tables that aren't necessarily defined in one set of code or another (see: sprawling classic ASP applications), and having a check constraint is valuable to make sure that the legacy codebase isn't violating referential integrity or uniqueness constraints. –  antinescience Mar 22 '13 at 18:50
    
Fully agreed - though the constraints should be there, only to protect the cases where upper layers of validation fail. I've done some performance testing of this as well: sqlperformance.com/2012/08/t-sql-queries/error-handling and mssqltips.com/sqlservertip/2632/… –  Aaron Bertrand Mar 22 '13 at 18:51
    
@antinescience "legacy systems" are always a huge pain. In a scenario like you describe, an idealistic solution would be encapsulating access to the data behind a consistent service layer that handles validation, and provides a set of error codes you control and that the clients can handle sanely. If no such thing exists, making do with constraints is fine, which I believe I covered with calling them a "last resort" solution. –  millimoose Mar 22 '13 at 18:53
    
@millimoose Oh, absolutely. Just making sure that there's an awareness that, unfortunately, sometimes you just don't have full control over what goes into your database when. ;] –  antinescience Mar 22 '13 at 18:56
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I see two questions here, and here's my take...

Are database constraints good? For large systems they're indepensible. Most large systems have more than one front end, and not always in compatible languages where middle-tier or UI data-checking logic can be shared. They may also have batch processes in Transact-SQL or PL/SQL only. It's fine to duplicate the checking on the front end, but in a multi-user app the only way to truly check uniqueness is to insert the record and see what the database says. Same with foreign key constraints - you don't truly know until you try to insert/update/delete.

Should exceptions be allowed to throw, or should return values be substituted? Here's the code from the question:

    try
    {
       // inset data
    }
    catch (SqlException ex)
    {
        if (ex.Message.ToLower().Contains("duplicate key"))
        {
            if (ex.Message.ToLower().Contains("url"))
            {
                return 1; // Sure, that's one good way to do it
            }
            if (ex.Message.ToLower().Contains("email"))
            {
                return 2; // Sure, that's one good way to do it
            }
        }
        return 3; // EVIL! Or at least quasi-evil :)
    }

If you can guarantee that the calling program will actually act based on the return value, I think the return 1 and return 2 are best left to your judgement. I prefer to rethrow a custom exception for cases like this (for example DuplicateEmailException) but that's just me - the return values will do the trick too. After all, consumer classes can ignore exceptions just as easily as they can ignore return values.

I'm against the return 3. This means there was an unexpected exception (database down, bad connection, whatever). Here you have an unspecified error, and the only diagnostic information you have is this: "3". Imagine posting a question on SO that says I tried to insert a row but the system said '3'. Please advise. It would be closed within seconds :)

If you don't know how to handle an exception in the data class, there's no way a consumer of the data class can handle it. At this point you're pretty much hosed so I say log the error, then exit as gracefully as possible with an "Unexpected error" message.

I know I ranted a bit about the unexpected exception, but I've handled too many support incidents where the programmer just sequelched database exceptions, and when something unexpected came up the app either failed silently or failed downstream, leaving zero diagnostic information. Very naughty.

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I would prefer a stored procedure that checks for potential violations before just throwing the data at SQL Server and letting the constraint bubble up an error. The reasons for this are performance-related:

http://www.sqlperformance.com/2012/08/t-sql-queries/error-handling

http://www.mssqltips.com/sqlservertip/2632/checking-for-potential-constraint-violations-before-entering-sql-server-try-and-catch-logic/

Some people will advocate that constraints at the database layer are unnecessary since your program can do everything. The reason I wouldn't rely solely on your C# program to detect duplicates is that people will find ways to affect the data without going through your C# program. You may introduce other programs later. You may have people writing their own scripts or interacting with the database directly. Do you really want to leave the table unprotected because they don't honor your business rules? And I don't think the C# program should just throw data at the table and hope for the best, either.

If your business rules change, do you really want to have to re-compile your app (or all of multiple apps)? I guess that depends on how well-protected your database is and how likely/often your business rules are to change.

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I did something like this:

public class SqlExceptionHelper
{
    public SqlExceptionHelper(SqlException sqlException)
    {
        // Do Nothing.
    }

    public static string GetSqlDescription(SqlException sqlException)
    {
        switch (sqlException.Number)
        {
             case 21:
                 return "Fatal Error Occurred: Error Code 21.";
             case 53:
                 return "Error in Establishing a Database Connection: 53.";
             default
                 return ("Unexpected Error: " + sqlException.Message.ToString());
         }
     }
}

Which allows it to be reusable, and it will allow you to get the Error Codes from SQL.

Then just implement:

public class SiteHandler : ISiteHandler
{
     public string InsertDataToDatabase(Handler siteInfo)
     {
          try
          {
              // Open Database Connection, Run Commands, Some additional Checks.
          }
          catch(SqlException exception)
          {
             SqlExceptionHelper errorCompare = new SqlExceptionHelper(exception);
             return errorCompare.ToString();
          }
     }
}

Then it is providing some specific errors for common occurrences. But as mentioned above; you really should ensure that you've tested your data before you just input it into your database. That way no mismatched constraints surface or exists.

Hope it points you in a good direction.

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Depends on what you're trying to do. Some things to think about:

  • Where do you want to handle your error? I would recommend as close to the data as possible.
  • Who do you want to know about the error? Does your user need to know that 'you've already used that ID'...?
  • etc.

Also -- constraints can be good -- I don't 100% agree with millimoose's answer on that point -- I mean, I do in the should be this way / better performance ideal -- but practically speaking, if you don't have control over your developers / qc, and especially when it comes to enforcing rules that could blow your database up (or otherwise, break dependent objects like reports, etc. if a duplicate key were to turn-up somewhere, you need some barrier against (for example) the duplicate key entry.

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