Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This one is actually very basic. Maybe someone comes with a good :) solution.

Have an interface, say, IComponent.

public interface IComponent {
    string GetStatus();
}

several implementations of IComponent need to skip one part of logic in GetStatus(), if current time is between 12:00AM and 12:10AM. But there are other implementations of IComponent which don't care about any time interval at all.

So to say:

public interface MyComponent : IComponent {
    public string GetStatus() {
        StringBuilder result = ...;
        ....
        if (/*current time between 12:00AM and 12:10AM */)
            result.Append("good enough");
        else {
            //calculate result
            result.Append(/*calculated result*/);
        }
        ...
        return result.ToString();
    }
}

So what I basically need is incapsulating

if (/*current time between 12:00AM and 12:10AM */)
        return "good enough";

into some class, let's call it 'SomeBehavior' or smth, and it can be re-used throughout required IComponent-implementations.

If it helps, the meaning of this if-condition is "skipping stat files check", so it can be named e.g. SkipStatFilesCheckBehavior.

Though I am not sure about naming too, that's why I am here (you might name them somehow more appropriate than "behavior"). What is the best way to implement it? How "behaviors" can be better injected into IComponent-implementations (e.g. via constructor or anything else)? Will the solution be extendable if I need some other "behaviors" in future? Maybe in future some kinds of "behaviors" will require a reference to IComponent-implementation.

share|improve this question
    
You could redirect the call to GetStatus to some delegate which you pass as the method to be executed during instantiation in the constructor. –  Thomas Mar 22 '13 at 19:31

3 Answers 3

Maybe something like this:

interface Component {
    String status();
}
abstract class ComponentABC implements Component {
    ComponentABC() {
        this(false,false);
    }
    ComponentABC(boolean behaviour1,boolean behaviour2) {
        this.behaviour1=behaviour1;
        this.behaviour2=behaviour2;
    }
    public String status() {
        String s="component";
        if(behaviour1)
            s+=" with behaviour1";
        if(behaviour2)
            s+=" with behaviour2";
        return s;
    }
    boolean behaviour1,behaviour2;
}
class BasicComponent extends ComponentABC {}
class Behaviour1Component extends ComponentABC {
    Behaviour1Component() {
        super(true,false);
    }
}
class Behaviour2Component extends ComponentABC {
    Behaviour2Component() {
        super(false,true);
    }
}
class BehaviourBothComponent extends ComponentABC {
    BehaviourBothComponent() {
        super(true,true);
    }
}
public class So15578113 {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Component[] components=new Component[]{new BasicComponent(),new Behaviour1Component(),new Behaviour2Component(),new BehaviourBothComponent()};
        for(Component component:components)
            System.out.println(component.status());

    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
At first glance I like it. Most likely it'll be an accepted answer. –  Alec Mar 23 '13 at 4:16
    
in java, i would use an enum for the behaviours since one can add different methods to each enum and you have enum set for combinations of behaviours, but you can't do that in c#. –  Ray Tayek Mar 23 '13 at 4:56

I posted an answer using Inheritance, but you said in your comment that you don't want to use inheritance. Here is a composition example:

public class Status 
{
    virtual public string getStatus()
    {
        StringBuilder result = new StringBuilder();
        if (1 == 1) //This IF statement will compare the time
            result.Append("good enough");
        else
        {
            //calculate result
            result.Append("calculated result");
        }
        return result.ToString();
    }
}

public class Component1 : IComponent
{
    public string getStatus()
    {
        Status component = new Status();
        String Status = component.getStatus();
        //Do the rest of the getStatus specific to Component1
        return Status;
    }
}

public class Component2 : IComponent
{
    public string getStatus()
    {
        String Status = "";
        //Do the rest of the getStatus specific to Component2
        return Status;
    }
}
public interface IComponent
{
    public string getStatus();
} 

In the code above Component1 "has a" status, but component 2 does not. You could create sub classes from the Status class to extend the behaviour of getStatus().

share|improve this answer
    
I don't like the fact that base class contains behavior that is pretty irrelevant (at all) to some of the inheritors. How is it extendable if I have several behaviors? –  Alec Mar 23 '13 at 4:13

I'd use the Proxy pattern. As far as I understand in your case you could use it this way :

// common interface
public class IComponent {
    // I split getStatus, because both concrete cases have
    // common pre and post processings
    public string GetStatus() {
        StringBuilder result = ...;
        preProcess(result);
        mainProcess(result);
        postProcess(result);
        return result.ToString();
    }
    private void preProcess(StringBuilder str);
    private void postProcess(StringBuilder str);
    // proxied method
    private void mainProcess(StringBuilder str);
}

// class implementing the basic behavior
public class MyComponent : IComponent {
    private void mainProcess(StringBuilder result) {
        result.Append(/*calculated result*/);
    }
}

// proxy class that calls the basic behavior under certain conditions only
public class SkipStatFilesCheckBehavior : IComponent {
    IComponent basicBehavior;

    public SkipStatFilesCheckBehavior(IComponent newBasicBehavior) {
        basicBehavior = newBasicBehavior;
    }

    private void mainProcess(StringBuilder result) {
        if (/*current time between 12:00AM and 12:10AM */)
            result.Append("good enough");
        else { 
            basicBehavior.mainProcess(result);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.