Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have two queues, let's say A and B, on which I execute the following algorithm:

while (queueA.Count > 0)
{
    var elemA = queueA.Peek();
    var elemB = queueB.Peek();
    if (AreSimilar(elemA, elemB))
    {
        Debug.Assert(elemA.SomeProperty == elemB.SomeProperty);
        queueA.Dequeue();
        queueB.Dequeue();
    }
    else
    {
        break;
    }    
}

Something tells me this could be written more succinctly; Peek() and Dequeue() might be combined in one operation as Dequeue() returns the same element as Peek(), and the if statement might be fused with the while statement, avoiding an explicit break. I'm just not seeing how to preserve the same behavior exactly, i.e. I don't want to remove an element unless it satisfies the condition in the 'if'.

share|improve this question

closed as off topic by cdhowie, wRAR, p.s.w.g, Oleksi, Iswanto San Mar 23 '13 at 2:33

Questions on Stack Overflow are expected to relate to programming within the scope defined by the community. Consider editing the question or leaving comments for improvement if you believe the question can be reworded to fit within the scope. Read more about reopening questions here.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
I don't think Peek and Dequeue can be combined, since they execute under different conditions. –  Ben Voigt Mar 22 '13 at 19:21
    
You can simplify a bit by doing if (AreSimilar(queueA.Peek(), queueB.Peek())) { but then you lose your ability to do your assert. –  cdhowie Mar 22 '13 at 19:22
1  
Sounds like Micro-Optimization and the real answer is, unless you are actually having performance issues, this is a waste of time, especially when it would be hard to tell how the compiler optimizes it. –  Erik Philips Mar 22 '13 at 19:26
    
@ErikPhilips I'm not worried about performance, just that I might be missing the obvious. –  Asik Mar 22 '13 at 19:28
1  
Ahh sounds like something for codereview.stackexchange.com :) –  Erik Philips Mar 22 '13 at 19:29
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can try this code that moves the assignment into the invocation of AreSimilar:

QueueElement elemA, elemB
while (queueA.Count > 0 && AreSimilar(elemA = queueA.Peek(), elemB = queueB.Peek())) {
    Debug.Assert(elemA.SomeProperty == elemB.SomeProperty);
    queueA.Dequeue();
    queueB.Dequeue();
}

Note that this is not necessarily more readable. In fact, your version is pretty good in terms of readability. The only thing I would do is inverting the condition to decrease nesting, but I'd leave everything else in place:

while (queueA.Count > 0)
{
    var elemA = queueA.Peek();
    var elemB = queueB.Peek();
    if (!AreSimilar(elemA, elemB))
    {
        break;
    }
    Debug.Assert(elemA.SomeProperty == elemB.SomeProperty);
    queueA.Dequeue();
    queueB.Dequeue();
}
share|improve this answer
1  
ewww inline assignment? –  p.s.w.g Mar 22 '13 at 19:25
    
Note that smaller code is not always more readable. This code will not be any faster, and is significantly less readable than the original. –  cdhowie Mar 22 '13 at 19:32
    
@p.s.w.g Well, 25+ years of coding in C tend to leave their mark on one's way of perceiving the beauty :) I fell in love with assignments embedded into conditions as soon as I realized what the semicolon was doing in the while(*dest++ = *src++) ; example in the K&R. –  dasblinkenlight Mar 22 '13 at 19:32
1  
@dasblinkenlight Clever code is not always readable. Someone reading your example snippet will have to ask themselves if you really meant =, or if that is incorrect and == was the intended operator. Trying to figure out what you meant is not where readers should be spending their time. –  cdhowie Mar 22 '13 at 19:35
    
@cdhowie Well, the OP did ask for a more succinct code, that's why I wrote something bordering on C code, but in C#. I edited the answer to include a more readable alternative (not surprisingly, it's almost an exact copy of the OP's code, improved slightly to reduce nesting). –  dasblinkenlight Mar 22 '13 at 19:42
show 1 more comment

What is the likelyhood that A and B would be similar? If the probability is high, you could always run w/ the assumed common scenario and Pop them (or Dequeue) them ASSUMING they'll be similar and then just worry about pushing them back on if they aren't similar...

share|improve this answer
    
That doesn't necessarily make the code more readable though, it just inverts the condition and actually makes it less readable (since there is no documented method on Queue to insert an object at the front of the queue, and one would have to resort to reflection to get at the object's internals). –  cdhowie Mar 22 '13 at 19:34
    
I didn't take readability and succinctness to necessarily mean the same thing... Dr_Asik also didn't say that items going onto the end of the queue was not an option... I agree that it could be considerably slower if the majority of the time it's having to repush the stuff back on the queue... It seemed like such an ethereal question that I just attempted to challenge some assumptions –  Rikon Mar 22 '13 at 19:44
add comment

You could simplify the loop with the help of a method, but you might consider this cheating:

static bool DequeuePairIf<T>(
    Func<T, T, bool> predicate,
    Queue<T> queueA,
    Queue<T> queueB)
{
    if (queueA.Count != 0 &&
        queueB.Count != 0 &&
        predicate(queueA.Peek(), queueB.Peek())
    ) {
        queueA.Dequeue();
        queueB.Dequeue();

        return true;
    }

    return false;
}

Then your loop becomes:

while (DequeuePairIf(AreSimilar, queueA, queueB)) { }

But I question if this kind of refactoring will help readability, or harm it. It's considerably larger than the original code, for one thing. On the other hand, smaller code is not always more readable.

(I removed the assert to simplify the logic here. If you still need to assert, then you will have to save the results of the Peek() invocations, as you do in your original code.)

share|improve this answer
add comment

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.