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I want to parse hashtags from the tweets I'm retrieving from twitter. Now, I didn't find anything available in the api. So, I'm parsing it on my own using php. I've tried several things.

<?php
$subject = "This is a simple #hashtag";
$pattern = "#\S*\w";
preg_match_all($pattern, $subject, $matches, PREG_OFFSET_CAPTURE);
print_r($matches);
?>

I've also tried

$pattern = "/[#]"."[A-Za-z0-9-_]"."/g";

But then it shows /g isn't recognized by php. I've been trying to do this for quite a long time now but am not being able to do this. So please help.

P.S. : I've a very little idea about Regular Experssions.

share|improve this question
    
The first one didn't work because you didn't specify the delimiters, the slashes at the beginning and the end. PHP doesn't recognize the g-flag because preg_match_all automatically matches all occurences (and that's what that flag does). You might want to try /#[a-z0-9\-_]+/i? Note: the i-flag makes the regex case-insensitive. –  Robin V. Mar 22 '13 at 19:31
    
/g == the _all in preg_match_all(). In the first, you forgot your delimiters for the regex, in the second, you have a wrong modifier. Either of the 2 would work pretty ok-ish if those things are fixed. –  Wrikken Mar 22 '13 at 19:33
    
Thanks a lot. It works. Actually I tried "/[#][A-Za-z0-9-]/" also. Then it said that no delimiter had been specified. Then I tried "/[#][A-Za-z0-9-][/\t]".. Then it said unknown modifier ' '. –  Shivam Mangla Mar 22 '13 at 19:36
    
But what if I want to specify the end of the regexp I'm searching for. Is there something wrong with "/[#][A-Za-z0-9-][/\t]"? –  Shivam Mangla Mar 22 '13 at 19:37

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You need to consider where a hashtag might appear. There are three cases:

  • at the beginning of a tweet,
  • after whitespace,
  • in the middle of a word - this must not be counted as a hashtag.

So this will match them correctly:

'/(^|\s)\#\w+/'

Explanation:

  • ^ can be used in OR statements
  • \s is used to catch spaces, tabs and new lines

Here is the complete code:

<?php
$subject = "#hashtag This is a simple #hashtag hello world #hastag2 last string not-a-hash-tag#hashtag3 and yet not -#hashtag";
$pattern = "/(?:^|\s)(\#\w+)/";
preg_match_all($pattern, $subject, $matches, PREG_OFFSET_CAPTURE);
print_r($matches);
?>
share|improve this answer
1  
Okay. Thanks a lot. I just read more about Regular Expressions. Thanks. :) –  Shivam Mangla Mar 22 '13 at 20:00

This works for me:

$subject = "This is a simple #hashtag hello world #hastag2 last string #hashtag3";
$pattern = "/(#\w+)/";
preg_match_all($pattern, $subject, $matches, PREG_OFFSET_CAPTURE);
print_r($matches);
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot. It works. But is it different from "/[#][A-Za-z0-9-]/" ? –  Shivam Mangla Mar 22 '13 at 19:40
1  
This will match also hashtags in the middle of words which are not hashtags. –  Haralan Dobrev Mar 22 '13 at 19:45

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