Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

This code is a linear search program using arrays. Out of curiosity, I was wondering how this code could be rewritten using STL vectors in place of arrays but still have the same output.

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
using namespace std;

template <typename T>
int linearSearch(T list[], int key, int arraySize)
{
  for (int i = 0; i < arraySize; i++)
  {
    if (key == list[i])
      return i;
  }

  return -1;
}

int main()
{
  int intArray[] =
  {
    1, 2, 3, 4, 8, 15, 23, 31
  };
  cout << "linearSearch(intArray, 3, 8) is " << linearSearch(intArray, 3, 8) << endl;
  cout << "linearSearch(intArray, 10, 8) is " << linearSearch(intArray, 10, 8) << endl;

  return 0;
}
share|improve this question
2  
All you have to change is T list[] to const std::vector<T> & and int intArray[] to std::vector<int> intArray. –  chris Mar 22 '13 at 19:32
2  
And you don't have to pass around the size of your list any more. –  Xymostech Mar 22 '13 at 19:32
3  
Actually you don't need the linearSearch function too, you can simply use std::find –  Loghorn Mar 22 '13 at 19:34

6 Answers 6

you can do it by changing your parameter type and in main.

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <vector>
using namespace std;

template <typename T>
int linearSearch(vector<T> list, int key)
{
   for (size_t i = 0; i < list.size(); i++)
   {
      if (key == list[i])
        return i;
   }

   return -1;
}

int main()
{
  int intArray[] =
  {
    1, 2, 3, 4, 8, 15, 23, 31
   };
   vector<int> list(intArray, intArray+8);

   cout << "linearSearch(list, 3,) is " << linearSearch(list, 3) << endl;
   cout << "linearSearch(list, 10) is " << linearSearch(list, 10) << endl;

   return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
3  
You don't have to pass the size of the vector, just use list.size() –  Xymostech Mar 22 '13 at 19:34
    
@Xymostech I agree. the reason I did that is that I want to make minimal change on the code. Code updated, thanks! –  taocp Mar 22 '13 at 19:35
template <typename T>
int linearSearch(const vector<T> &list, const T &key)
{
    auto itr = std::find(list.begin(), list.end(), key);

    if (itr != list.end())
        return std::distance(list.begin(), itr);
    else
        return -1;
}

int main()
{
    int intArray[] = {1, 2, 3, 4, 8, 15, 23, 31};

    std::vector<int> vec(intArray, intArray + 8);

    int i = linearSearch(vec, 15);
}

Note: C++11 is enabled

share|improve this answer
    
I think they mean, "using std::vectors in the code, instead of raw arrays", not actually converting. –  Xymostech Mar 22 '13 at 19:32
1  
@Xymostech Then they have to write "using std::vectors in the code, instead of raw arrays" and not "converting". –  user529758 Mar 22 '13 at 19:33
    
@H2CO3 In their question, they say "I was wondering how this code could be rewritten using STL vectors in place of arrays". Perhaps their title is just not informative. –  Xymostech Mar 22 '13 at 19:33
    
@Xymostech Yes, and that's a serious error, isn't it? –  user529758 Mar 22 '13 at 19:35
1  
@H2CO3 Indeed it is. –  Xymostech Mar 22 '13 at 19:39

This could work (it is based on the STL implementation):

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <vector>

using namespace std;

template <typename ForwardIter, typename Type>
int linearSearch(ForwardIter beg, ForwardIter end, Type key )
{
  int i = 0;
  for (;beg != end; ++beg)
  {
    if (key == *beg)
      return i;
    i++;
  }

  return -1;
}

int main()
{
  vector< int > vec = { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 };
  cout << "linearSearch 1 is " << linearSearch(vec.begin(), vec.end(), 4) << endl;
  cout << "linearSearch 2 is " << linearSearch(vec.begin()+2, vec.end(), 1) << endl;

  return 0;
}

Note: it can also work for, std::list and std::deque. I think it will produce correct results even in a normal array.

share|improve this answer

With as few changes as possible you could do this:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <vector>
using namespace std;

// Using const std::vector<T> & to prevent making a copy of the container
template <typename T>
int linearSearch(const std::vector<T> &list, int key)
{
  for (size_t i = 0; i < list.size(); i++)
  {
    if (key == list[i])
      return i;
  }

  return -1;
}

int main()
{
  std::vector<int> arr = { 1 ,2, 3, 4, 8, 15, 23, 31 } ;

  cout << "linearSearch(intArray, 3) is " << linearSearch(arr, 3) << endl;
  cout << "linearSearch(intArray, 10) is " << linearSearch(arr, 10) << endl;

  return 0;
}

I would recommend not using using namespace std;.

share|improve this answer
 template <typename T>
 int linearSearch(T list, int key)

Changing the two first lines of your code as above, as well as replacing arraySize with list.size() should suffice for any kind of container supporting operator [] (including vectors), and indices as consecutive int.

Note that while your template tries to abstract the content of the array as the typename T, it implicitely assumes it is int in the type of key. A more generic implementation would be:

template <typename T>
int linearSearch(T list, typename T::value_type key)

Another issue in this solution is the passing mode of list. We can overcome this issue by converting it to a reference like so:

// includes ...
#include <type_traits>
using namespace std;

template <typename T>
int linearSearch(add_lvalue_reference<T> list, typename T::value_type key){
    for (size_t i = 0; i < list.size(); i++) {
        if (key == list[i])
            return i;
    }
    return -1;
}
share|improve this answer

You probably asked for the something like this (std::vector is used instead of hand-made class):

const size_t count = 8; 
int values[count] = {1, 2, 3, 4, 8, 15, 23, 31};
std::vector<int> intArray;
intArray.assign(values, values + count);

std::vector<int>::iterator val1 = std::find(intArray.begin(), intArray.end(), 3);
int pos1 = (val1 != intArray.end()) ? (val1 - intArray.begin()) : -1;

std::vector<int>::iterator val2 = std::find(intArray.begin(), intArray.end(), 10);
int pos2 = (val2 != intArray.end()) ? (val2 - intArray.begin()) : -1;

cout << "linearSearch(intArray, 3, 8) is " << pos1 << endl;
cout << "linearSearch(intArray, 10, 8) is " << pos2 << endl;
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.