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I have a typical CSS file format:

.success {
    color: #8FA442;
    border: 1px solid #C2D288;
}
.error {
    color: #b3696c;
    border: 1px solid #f7c7c9;
}

I want to match every style name and what is in the {}. I got the {} part and am able to parse the contents easily, however, the problem is that style names can be arrays (e.g. #contactform .input, .textarea) and I want to capture the whole thing, in fact everything from the previous closing }.

What I've tried are different variations of

m/\}(.+)(\{.+?\})/g

But that grabs the whole file. If I do

$doc =~ m/(\w+)\s+(\{.+?\})/g

that captures each style {} fine but only the last token of the name, so for #contactform .input, .textarea, it would only capture .textarea.

What to do?

share|improve this question
    
(\w+) captures an unbroken string of word characters. Since CSS files can contain comments or comment like strings (such as in IE hacks), chances of coming up with a simplistic regex pattern that deals with all possibilities seem to me to be close to nil. –  Sinan Ünür Mar 22 '13 at 19:58

2 Answers 2

Use CSS::DOM instead. Simplistic regex patterns are unlikely to prove equal to the task.

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use 5.012;
use strict;
use warnings;

use CSS::DOM;

my $css = my $sheet = CSS::DOM::parse(do {local $/; <DATA>});
my $rules = $css->cssRules;

for my $rule ( @$rules ) {
    say $rule->selectorText;
}

__DATA__
#contactform  .success {
    color: #8FA442;
    border: 1px solid #C2D288;
}
.error {
    color: #b3696c;
    border: 1px solid #f7c7c9;
}
share|improve this answer
    
but just for curiosity sake, can you tell what's wrong with my regex? –  amphibient Mar 22 '13 at 19:48
2  
@amphibient Take for example .class::before{content: "{foo}"}. You'd select content: "{foo as body. And you said yourself you weren't able to match the selector correctly. CSS is a context-free language, which you can't match with simple regexes: you need a grammar (Perl regexes can include grammars, but that is a different topic). –  amon Mar 22 '13 at 19:59

Or you can use the one just called CSS.

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