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  1. I'd like do create a class with one generic TKey, where TKey is one of System.Tuple types that can be created.

    public class Class1<TKey> where TKey : System.Tuple
    { 
           /// Class Stuff Goes Here where TKey is one of the 8 tuple 
               types found in the link in (1)
    
    }
    

I am not so sure how to implement this. The goal is to prevent myself from implementing a class for each tuple class.

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3  
Each different Tuple<> type has a different number of generic arguments, and they are therefore different types. You can't add a constraint against all of them at once. Is there a reason that TKey needs to be constrained? –  cdhowie Mar 22 '13 at 19:48
    
@cdhowie I answered the question in your solution, but I'll post it here "there is absolute reason that it has to be one of the tuple classes, the idea is to have TKey to act as a key with n parameters, i.e. T1, T2, T3, ..., Tn." –  Maelstrom Yamato Mar 22 '13 at 20:00

4 Answers 4

You can't as others have stated, but you can almost do it.

So all the Tuple<...> classes have a signature like this:

public class Tuple<T1, ...> : 
    IStructuralEquatable, 
    IStructuralComparable, 
    IComparable, 
    ITuple

All of those interfaces save ITuple are public (ITuple is an internal interface), so you can try crafting something like so:

public interface ITupleKey<TKey>
    where TKey : IStructuralEquatable, IStructuralComparable, IComparable
{
}

"But wait!", you say, "How can I be sure nothing else is implementing those interfaces?"

Well, you can't. But like I said, this is just an almost way - luckily, IStructuralEquatable and IStructuralComparable are only (at the framework level, naturally) used in the following types:

System.Array
System.Tuple<T1>
System.Tuple<T1,T2>
System.Tuple<T1,T2,T3>
System.Tuple<T1,T2,T3,T4>
System.Tuple<T1,T2,T3,T4,T5>
System.Tuple<T1,T2,T3,T4,T5,T6>
System.Tuple<T1,T2,T3,T4,T5,T6,T7>
System.Tuple<T1,T2,T3,T4,T5,T6,T7,TRest>

So it's pretty close. Combine this with a runtime check that TKey actually is some variant of Tuple, and you might have what you need.

EDIT:

Some basic usage:

public class Class1<TKey> 
    where TKey : IStructuralEquatable, IStructuralComparable, IComparable
{ 
}

// will compile
var classTup1 = new Class1<Tuple<int>>();
var classTup2 = new Class1<Tuple<int,int>>();
var classTup3 = new Class1<Tuple<int,int,int>>();
var classTup4 = new Class1<Tuple<int,int,int,int>>();
var classTup5 = new Class1<Tuple<int,int,int,int,int>>();

// won't compile
var badclassTup1 = new Class1<int>();
var badclassTup2 = new Class1<string>();
var badclassTup3 = new Class1<object>();

And, because I've clearly gone insane, let's see what's possible here:

public class Class1<TKey> 
    where TKey : IStructuralEquatable, IStructuralComparable, IComparable
{ 
    public Class1(TKey key)
    {
        Key = key;
        TupleRank = typeof(TKey).GetGenericArguments().Count();
        TupleSubtypes = typeof(TKey).GetGenericArguments();
        Console.WriteLine("Key type is a Tuple (I think) with {0} elements", TupleRank);
        TupleGetters = 
            Enumerable.Range(1, TupleRank)
                .Select(i => typeof(TKey).GetProperty(string.Concat("Item",i.ToString())))
                .Select(pi => pi.GetGetMethod())
                .Select(getter => Delegate.CreateDelegate(
                            typeof(Func<>).MakeGenericType(getter.ReturnType), 
                            this.Key, 
                            getter))
                .ToList();
    }

    public int TupleRank {get; private set;}
    public IEnumerable<Type> TupleSubtypes {get; private set;}
    public IList<Delegate> TupleGetters {get; private set;}
    public TKey Key {get; private set;}

    public object this[int rank]
    {
        get { return TupleGetters[rank].DynamicInvoke(null);}
    }
    public void DoSomethingUseful()
    {
        for(int i=0; i<TupleRank; i++)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Key value for {0}:{1}", string.Concat("Item", i+1), this[i]);
        }
    }
}

Test rig:

var classTup1 = new Class1<Tuple<int>>(Tuple.Create(1));
var classTup2 = new Class1<Tuple<int,int>>(Tuple.Create(1,2));
var classTup3 = new Class1<Tuple<int,int,int>>(Tuple.Create(1,2,3));
var classTup4 = new Class1<Tuple<int,int,int,int>>(Tuple.Create(1,2,3,4));
var classTup5 = new Class1<Tuple<int,int,int,int,int>>(Tuple.Create(1,2,3,4,5));

classTup1.DoSomethingUseful();
classTup2.DoSomethingUseful();
classTup3.DoSomethingUseful();
classTup4.DoSomethingUseful();
classTup5.DoSomethingUseful();

Output:

Key type is a Tuple (I think) with 1 elements
Key type is a Tuple (I think) with 2 elements
Key type is a Tuple (I think) with 3 elements
Key type is a Tuple (I think) with 4 elements
Key type is a Tuple (I think) with 5 elements
Key value for Item1:1
Key value for Item1:1
Key value for Item2:2
Key value for Item1:1
Key value for Item2:2
Key value for Item3:3
Key value for Item1:1
Key value for Item2:2
Key value for Item3:3
Key value for Item4:4
Key value for Item1:1
Key value for Item2:2
Key value for Item3:3
Key value for Item4:4
Key value for Item5:5
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for this post. I might consider it for implementation. –  Maelstrom Yamato Mar 22 '13 at 20:16
    
@MaelstromYamato Good Luck! I added a quick-and-dirty usage example as well –  JerKimball Mar 22 '13 at 20:24
    
In my experience this is the next best solution right behind not creating this problem in the first place. It gives you access to all the members of those interfaces which are common. –  Dandy Mar 22 '13 at 21:12
    
Agreed; I just like trying to figure out ways one can abuse the type system. ;) –  JerKimball Mar 22 '13 at 21:38
    
After working to demo your solution, it can be done but is a very ugly implementation. :) –  IAbstract Mar 22 '13 at 22:32

You cannot do this, for two reasons.

First, you can't do "or" constraints on generic types. You could have to have a constraint on Tuple<T1, T2> or Tuple<T1, T2, T3>. This is not possible.

Second, you would need to "pass through" generic arguments, like so:

public class Class1<TKey, T1, T2> where TKey : System.Tuple<T1, T2>

So, you would need a variable number of generic type arguments for your class, and this is not supported either.

Unless there is a specific reason why TKey absolutely has to be one of the tuple classes, leave it unconstrained.

share|improve this answer
    
there is absolute reason that it has to be one of the tuple classes, the idea is to have TKey to act as a key with n parameters, i.e. T1, T2, T3, ..., Tn. –  Maelstrom Yamato Mar 22 '13 at 19:58
    
@MaelstromYamato But why does it have to be one of the tuple classes? Do you intend to cast the result to a specific Tuple type? Why could someone not implement their own tuple-like class and then use that? –  cdhowie Mar 22 '13 at 19:58
    
To clarify: since you can't determine which tuple type is in use here, you couldn't cast it to a specific Tuple<> type with any confidence, even if you could (ab)use generics this way. –  cdhowie Mar 22 '13 at 20:02
    
TKey is based on a set of parameters, i.e. T1, T2, ..., Tn. I have several situations where the total number of parameters are different. So is Tuple necessary? I would say no. however, for any n, T1, T2, ..., Tn, can be thought of as a tuple, hence I think a constraint on TKey is reasonable. –  Maelstrom Yamato Mar 22 '13 at 20:07
1  
Any number of T's can be thought of as a tuple, but the framework only has Tuple types for up to eight T's. No, there isn't even a way to specify a variable number of generic arguments in this way. –  cdhowie Mar 22 '13 at 20:11

You can't. The different generic variants of Tuple does not have a reasonable common base class or interface.

The purpose of generic constraint is to tell the compiler what members the generic type is expected to have.

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Like so:

public class Class1<TKey,P,Q> where TKey : System.Tuple<P,Q>
{ 
       /// Class Stuff Goes Here where TKey is one of the 8 tuple 
           types found in the link in (1)

}

Add the generic parameters of Tuple to your class'

As per the comment below, there's no way to combine this into one class without interfaces or reflection. If there was there wouldn't have been multiple Tuple classes

But... you can define your own base interface that's inherited by multiple Class1 and then use that interface as a constraint. Doesn't sound pretty but would work

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1  
This will not allow TKey to be any of the other tuple types, such as Tuple<T1, T2, T3>. This is required by the OP's question. –  cdhowie Mar 22 '13 at 19:50

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