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Flash implements a dictionary (that is, something like a HashMap) using two approaches. One approach is the flash.utils.Dictionary class, and the other is a generic Object. I'd like to check how many key:value pairs are in the dictionary. In most cases I'd simply like to know it there are any key:value pairs, that is, just check if it's empty.

The documentation hasn't been much help on this point. Is there a simple and clear way to do this? Failing that, is there an ugly, yet not too brittle way to do this?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The only way that comes to mind is to iterate through all the keys and count them - like so:

var count:int = 0;

for (var key:Object in dict)
{
   count++;
}

Pretty lame - but I think that is what you are left with. Note that the Dictionary is just a really really really thin wrapper for the vanilla Object.

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This will reliably tell you if a particular dictionary is empty:

function isEmptyDictionary(dict:Dictionary):Boolean
{
    for each(var obj:Object in dict)
    {
        if(obj != null)
        {
           return false
        }
    }
    return true;
 }

Note that you need to do the obj != null check - even if you set myDictionary[key] = null, it will still iterate as a null object, so a regular for...in loop won't work in that instance. (If you are always using delete myDictionary[key] you should be fine though).

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2  
This seems like a solution for bad practices. Removing an entry from the dictionary should remove both the key and the value. If for some reason, I want to remove the value but leave the key, then the dict isn't really empty -- it has some (apparently meaningful) keys in it. –  Dan Homerick Oct 14 '09 at 17:32
    
Fair enough. If you remove the (obj != null) statement then this will work, but I'm guessing the other answer will work too... –  Reuben Oct 14 '09 at 20:27
2  
Actually, wouldn't it be best to combine the above approach that uses for...in with this one? The for...in approach tells you if you have any keys at all, which is important. This approach can fail if you have a key with a null value. –  scriptocalypse Apr 19 '11 at 19:28

Another approach is to add a dictionary entry dict["count"] that iterates up each time you add an item to the dictionary and iterates down each time you delete an item. Or a more sophisticated solution would subclass Dictionary and add push, pop, and a length property which does basically the same thing.

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And the empty / not empty special case mentioned by the OP:

var empty:Boolean = true;

for (var key:Object in dict)
{
   empty = false;
   break;
}

Code like this should go in a utility function instead of duplicating it all over the place so at the point of use it will be obvious what's going on.

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