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I'm using PHP to parse an e-mail and want to get the number after a specific string: For example, I would want to get the number 033 from from this string:

 Account Number: 033 
 Account Information: Some text here

There is always the word Account Number: and then the number and then a line break. I have:

 preg_match_all('!\d+!', $str, $matches);

But that just gets all the numbers...

Any help would be great! Thanks

EDIT:

The text is HTML... that may be the problem:

    <font face="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" color="#000099"><strong><font color="#660000">Account 
     Number</font></strong><font color="#660000">: 033<br>
    <strong>Account Name</strong>: More text here<br>
share|improve this question
    
There are more numbers than just this in the larger string (I just took a piece) So I would only want the number after the "Account Number" and not any other numbers –  Bill Mar 23 '13 at 0:13
    
They may not necessarily be in order either –  Bill Mar 23 '13 at 0:14
    
That HTML is malformed btw. –  Ja͢ck Aug 22 '13 at 10:44

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If the number is always after Account Number: (including that space at the end), then just add that to your regex:

preg_match_all('/Account Number: ([\d]+)/',$str,$matches);
// The parentheses capture the digits and stores them in $matches[1]

Results:

$matches Array:
(
    [0] => Array
        (
            [0] => Account Number: 033
        )

    [1] => Array
        (
            [0] => 033
        )

)

Note: If there is HTML present, then that can be included in the regex as well as long as you don't believe the HTML is subject to change. Otherwise, I suggest using an HTML DOM Parser to get to the plain-text version of your string and using a regex from there.

With that said, the following is an example that includes the HTML in the regex and provides the same output as above:

// Notice the delimiter 
preg_match_all('@<font face="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" color="#000099"><strong><font color="#660000">Account 
Number</font></strong><font color="#660000">: ([\d]+)@',$str,$matches);
share|improve this answer
    
That's returning an empty array... Could it be that this is coming from an e-mail? I'm using quoted_printable_decode() as well: $fullBody = imap_fetchbody($mbox,$email_number, 1.0); $str = quoted_printable_decode($fullBody); –  Bill Mar 23 '13 at 0:21
    
It could be because of hidden characters in your text. copied and pasted the text you had, and it works on www.myregextester.com. –  Josh Mar 23 '13 at 0:27
    
hmm... so I need to convert the html to plain text maybe.... –  Bill Mar 23 '13 at 0:27
    
Ah, if it is HTML then that makes more sense. Yes, those HTML characters are taken into account in the regex. If you know the html tags within that code, you could either add that to your regex if you know they will not change or include more attributes than they do now, or use an HTML DOM Parser. –  Josh Mar 23 '13 at 0:29
1  
I got it working now! Thanks –  Bill Mar 23 '13 at 1:02
$str = 'Account Number: 033 
 Account Information: Some text here';

preg_match('/Account Number:\s*(\d+)/', $str, $matches);

echo $matches[1]; // 033

You don't need to use preg_match_all() also you did not put your match into a backreference by placing it within parentheses.

share|improve this answer

Taking the HTML as the base:

$str = '<font face="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" color="#000099"><strong><font
    color="#660000">Account Number</font></strong><font color="#660000">: 033<br>
    <strong>Account Name</strong>: More text here<br>';
preg_match_all('!Account Number:\s+(\d+)!ims', strip_tags($str), $matches);
var_dump($matches);

and we get:

array(2) {
    [0]=>
    array(1) {
        [0]=>
        string(19) "Account Number: 033"
    }
    [1]=>
    array(1) {
        [0]=>
        string(3) "033"
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 I.. forgot about strip_tags. If this works, then this should be the answer. –  Josh Mar 23 '13 at 0:48

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