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I have to define a function: add_info(new_info, new_list)takes a tuple with four elements containing the information about a person, and a new list. If the name of the person is not already in the list, the list is updated with the new person’s information and True is returned to signify that the operation was successful. Otherwise, an error is printed, the list is unchanged and False is returned.

For example:

>>>d = load_file(’people.csv’)
>>>d
[(John’, ’Ministry of Silly Walks’, ’5555’, ’27 October’),
(’Eric’, ’Spamalot’, ’5555’, ’29 March’)]
>>>add_info((’John’, ’Cheese Shop’, ’555’, ’5 May’), d)
John is already on the list
False
>>>d
[(John’, ’Ministry of Silly Walks’, ’5555’, ’27 October’),
(’Eric’, ’Spamalot’, ’5555’, ’29 March’)]
>>>add_info((’Michael’, ’Cheese Shop’, ’555’, ’5 May’), d)
True
>>>d
[(John’, ’Ministry of Silly Walks’, ’5555’, ’27 October’),
(’Eric’, ’Spamalot’, ’5555’, ’29 March’), 
(’Michael’, ’Cheese Shop’, ’555’, ’5 May’)]

My code so far looks like this:

def load_file(filename):
with open(filename, 'Ur') as f:
    return list(f)

def save_file(filename, new_list):
with open(filename, 'w') as f:
    f.write('\n'.join(new_list) + '\n')

def save_file(filename, new_list):
with open(filename, 'w') as f:
    f.write(line + '\n' for line in new_list)


def save_file(filename, new_list):
with open(filename, 'w') as f:
    for line in new_list:
        f.write(line + '\n')

def add_info(new_info, new_list):


name = new_info

for item in new_list:
    if item == name:
        print str(new_info) , "is already on the list."
        return False
else:
    new_list.append(new_info)
    return True

Whenever I put in a name that is already in the list, it just adds the name to the list. Can't work out what to do. Any ideas?

Thanks in advance!

share|improve this question
    
"Programming in Python 3 - A Complete Introduction to the Python Language" was a very good book. You start writing useful programs right from the start. –  Vladislav Zorov Mar 23 '13 at 0:29
    
Is there some particular reason to keep this as a list of tuples rather than, for example, a dictionary of tuples and a list of keys (perhaps wrapping those two in a class)? –  Jim Dennis Mar 23 '13 at 0:44

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Sounds like I'm probably doing your homework for you, but anyway...

def add_info(new_info, new_list):
    # Persons name is the first item of the list
    name = new_info[0]

    # Check if we already have an item with that name
    for item in new_list:
        if item[0] == name:
            print "%s is already in the list" % name
            return False

    # Insert the item into the list
    new_list.append(new_info)
    return True
share|improve this answer
1  
For line 6, I would prefer if any((item[0] == name for item in new_list)), but perhaps less readable for beginners –  minism Mar 23 '13 at 0:33
    
Thanks for the help, I've used a variant of this code and keep getting True back regardless if the name is in the list. –  Eden Maynard Mar 23 '13 at 2:21

Your if statement is comparing a string (item[0]) to a list (name). So that test always fails and it moves to the else statement which returns True.

share|improve this answer
    
How do you compare what's in a string to what's in a list? –  Eden Maynard Mar 23 '13 at 3:33
    
How can you compare what's in a string to what's in a list? –  Eden Maynard Mar 23 '13 at 4:00

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