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Hello experts!

I have an Euler rotation matrix:

a11 = cos(psi)*cos(phi) - cos(theta)*sin(phi)*sin(psi);
a12 = cos(psi)*sin(phi) + cos(theta)*cos(phi)*sin(psi);
a13 = sin(psi)*sin(theta);
a21 = -sin(psi)*cos(phi) - cos(theta)*sin(phi)*cos(psi);
a22 = -sin(psi)*sin(phi) + cos(theta)*cos(phi)*cos(psi);
a23 = cos(psi)*sin(theta);
a31 = sin(theta)*sin(phi);
a32 = -sin(theta)*cos(phi);
a33 = cos(theta);

rotationMatrix = [a11 a12 a13; a21 a22 a23; a31 a32 a33]

I'm sure the rotation matrix is correct. The problem occurs when I try to apply a rotation to a wobj file (a box in this case).

I want to rotate a box which looks like:

vertices =

 0     0     0
 0     2     0
 0     2     2
 0     0     2
 2     0     2
 2     0     0
 2     2     0
 2     2     2

If I do:

rot= rotationMatrix*vertices'

and then turn the vertices back around again after the rotation

FV.vertices = rot'

I get a wrong rotation. Can anyone help me out please?

Illustration of the problem: The box is not rotated like the red system (X,Y,Z)

share|improve this question
    
Which Euler sequence is this? – ja72 Mar 23 '13 at 3:43
    
The local z-axis has coordinates (a13,a23,a33). Does this come out when you draw the vector (red z-axis) above? – ja72 Mar 23 '13 at 3:45
    
@ja72 This is the x-convention if that is what you mean? The rotated system is rotated with a matrix 2*eye(3) and is working fine. If I limit the vertices so that they match the object: v 2 0 0 v 0 2 0 v 0 0 2 They rotate correctly. The problem occurs, when i try to include more than three vertices. – Attaque Mar 23 '13 at 11:30
    
There are multiple sequences of Euler angles and I was wondering which one you are using. For example ZYX, YZX, ZXZ, etc. – ja72 Mar 23 '13 at 16:28
    
I use ZXZ as described here: Euler angles – Attaque Mar 23 '13 at 17:17

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