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Context

We're building a blog for an intro. to databases course project.

In our blog, we want to be able to set Labels on Posts. The Labels can't exist by themselves, they only do so if they are related to a Posts. This way, Labels that are not used by any Posts shouldn't stay in the database.

More than one Label can belong to a single Post, and more than a single Post can use a Label.

We are using both SQLite3 (locally/testing) and PostgreSQL (deployment).

Implementation

Here is the SQL (SQLite3 flavor) that we use to create those two tables, along with the relationship table:

Posts

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS Posts(
   id INTEGER PRIMARY KEY AUTOINCREMENT,
   authorId INTEGER,
   title VARCHAR(255),
   content TEXT,
   imageURL VARCHAR(255),
   date DATETIME,
   FOREIGN KEY (authorId) REFERENCES Authors(id) ON DELETE SET NULL
)

Labels

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS Labels(
   id INTEGER PRIMARY KEY AUTOINCREMENT,
   name VARCHAR(255) UNIQUE,
   -- This is not working:
   FOREIGN KEY (id) REFERENCES LabelPosts(labelId) ON DELETE CASCADE 
)

LabelPosts (relation between Post [1..*] -- * Label)

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS LabelPosts(
    postId INTEGER,
    labelId INTEGER,
    PRIMARY KEY (postId, labelId),
    FOREIGN KEY (postId) REFERENCES Posts(id) ON DELETE CASCADE
)

Problem

  • Using SQLite3, Labels are not deleted from the database when I remove all references to it from the LabelPosts table. I think for the reason given by Postgres, despite SQLite accepting the table without warning.

  • PostgreSQL complains that labelId is not unique within LabelPosts, which is true and also required, since it's many-to-many:

pq: S:"ERROR" R:"transformFkeyCheckAttrs" L:"6511" C:"42830" F:"tablecmds.c"
M:"there is no unique constraint matching given keys for referenced table \"labelposts\""

So I understand that I'm doing my constraint wrong. However I don't know how to do it properly.

share|improve this question
    
Are you allowed to use triggers? –  Priidu Neemre Mar 23 '13 at 1:02
    
Yes I am, but I'm not too familiar with them. –  AntoineG Mar 23 '13 at 1:05
3  
This does not look like a very standard approach of doing things. I can see what you're trying to achieve, however the foreign key constraint on table Labels does not fit. You should do CONSTRAINT fk_LabelPosts_labelId FOREIGN KEY(labelId) REFERENCES Labels(labelId) on LabelPosts instead (in my mind). Some other minor observations: 1. It is often advised to name your entities in singular form, ie. Label, Post and LabelPost in this case. 2. I would recommend naming all constraints - this will make it easier to DROP unneccessary constraints later. –  Priidu Neemre Mar 23 '13 at 1:11
    
If I switch the constraint on the relation, it implies that a Post could only form a relation with a Label if this Label already exists, which is not what I want. Also, it wouldn't solve my problem where I want Labels to disappear automatically once they are not referenced by any Post. –  AntoineG Mar 23 '13 at 1:16

2 Answers 2

up vote 10 down vote accepted
  • Your first big mistake:

We are using both SQLite3 (locally/testing) and PostgreSQL (deployment).

This is begging for trouble. You will keep running into minor incompatibilities. Or not even notice them until much later, when damage is done. Don't do it. Use PostgreSQL locally, too. It's freely available for most every OS. For someone involved in a "databases course project" this is a surprising folly.

  • In PostgreSQL use a serial column instead of SQLite AUTOINCREMENT.
    Use timestamp (or timestamptz) instead of datetime.

  • Don't use mixed case identifiers.

  • Don't use non-descriptive column names like id. Ever. That's an anti-pattern introduced by half-wit middleware and ORMs. When you join a couple of tables you end up with multiple columns of the name id. That's actively hurtful.

  • There are many naming styles, but most agree it's better to have singular terms as table names. It's shorter and at least as intuitive / logical. label, not labels.

  • As @Priidu mentioned in the comments, your foreign key constraints are backwards. This is not up for debate, they are simply wrong.

Everything put together, it could look like this:

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS post (
   post_id   serial PRIMARY KEY
  ,author_id integer
  ,title     text
  ,content   text
  ,image_url text
  ,date      timestamp
);

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS label (
   label_id  serial PRIMARY KEY
  ,name      text UNIQUE
);

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS label_post(
    post_id  integer REFERENCES post(post_id)
             ON UPDATE CASCADE ON DELETE CASCADE
   ,label_id integer REFERENCES label(label_id)
             ON UPDATE CASCADE ON DELETE CASCADE
   ,PRIMARY KEY (post_id, label_id)
);

Trigger

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION f_trg_kill_orphaned_label() 
  RETURNS TRIGGER AS
$func$
BEGIN
   DELETE FROM label
   WHERE  label_id = OLD.label_id
   AND    NOT EXISTS (
      SELECT 1 FROM label_post
      WHERE  label_id = OLD.label_id
      );
END
$func$ LANGUAGE plpgsql;
  • trigger function must be created before the trigger.

  • A simple DELETE command can do the job. No second query needed - in particular no count(*). EXISTS is cheaper.

  • No single-quotes around plpgsql. It's an identifier, not a value!

CREATE TRIGGER label_post_delaft_kill_orphaned_label
AFTER DELETE ON label_post
FOR EACH ROW EXECUTE PROCEDURE f_trg_kill_orphaned_label();

There is no CREATE OR REPLACE TRIGGER in PostgreSQL, yet. Just CREATE TRIGGER.

share|improve this answer
    
+1, very good key points. –  Priidu Neemre Mar 23 '13 at 1:48
    
You should prefer Erwin's implementation of the trigger, as he does everything in one atomic statement which is always good (not only for being faster). –  Priidu Neemre Mar 23 '13 at 2:07
    
@Priidu .. also minimizing the chance for a race condition. :) –  Erwin Brandstetter Mar 23 '13 at 2:07
    
Wow, that's a great lot of good info! I really appreciate your insight, I didn't get to receive practical advices like that from class. –  AntoineG Mar 23 '13 at 2:25
5  
@MohamedMansour: Well, I disagree. ORMs are primitive crutches that regularly fail to get the full potential out of your RDBMS. With Oracle, it might make sense to reduce costs, but that doesn't apply with PostgreSQL. Even if you work with an ORM, there is nothing to gain from using different RDBMS. You can only lose. You need a query to be fast and decide to go with a certain query, because it delivers best performance? Guess what? Not true on the productive DB ... Develop with the same RDBMS if you can! That's a no-brainer. –  Erwin Brandstetter Mar 23 '13 at 7:43

One way to achieve the behaviour you seek (delete unused labels from the database) would be to use triggers.

You could try writing something like:

CREATE OR REPLACE TRIGGER tr_LabelPosts_chk_no_more_associated_posts 
AFTER DELETE ON LabelPosts 
FOR EACH ROW 
EXECUTE PROCEDURE f_LabelPosts_chk_no_more_associated_posts();


CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION f_LabelPosts_chk_no_more_associated_posts() 
RETURNS TRIGGER AS $$
DECLARE
    var_associated_post_count INTEGER;
BEGIN
    SELECT Count(*) AS associated_post_count INTO var_associated_post_count FROM LabelPosts WHERE labelId = OLD.labelId;
    IF(var_associated_post_count = 0) THEN
        DELETE FROM Labels WHERE labelId = OLD.labelId;
    END IF;
END
$$ LANGUAGE 'plpgsql';

Basically, what happens here is:

  1. A row is deleted from table Posts.
  2. The deletion is cascaded to all associated rows in LabelPosts (thanks to your foreign key constraint).
  3. After the deletion of every single row in LabelPosts the trigger is activated, which in turn calls the PostgreSQL function.
  4. The function checks whether there are any other posts connected with the labelId in question. If so, then it finishes without any further modification. However, if there aren't any other rows in the relationship table, then the label is not used elsewhere and can thus be deleted.
  5. The function executes a delete DML on the Labels table, effectively removing the (now) unused label.

Obviously the naming isn't the best and there must be a ton of syntax errors in there, so see here and here for more information. There may be better ways to taking this thing down, however at the moment I can't think of a fast method that would not destroy the nice generic-looking table structure.

Although bare in mind - it is not generally a good practice to overburden your database with triggers. It makes every associated query/statement run a tat slower & also makes administration considerably more difficult. (Sometimes you need to disable triggers to perform certain DML operations, etc. depending on the nature of your triggers).

share|improve this answer
2  
+1 on explanation and advice (not the trigger implementation). –  Erwin Brandstetter Mar 23 '13 at 2:15

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