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I've got a function whose purpose is to recieve an array of numbers separated by spaces, and one number at a time, assign them to a variable of a struct like this:

typedef struct coo {
    int x;
    int y;
} Coord;

typedef struct exer {
    Coord coords[1000];
} exercise;


int coordinates(char *sent){
    char * pal;
    int k=0;
    pal = strtok (sent," ");
    while (pal != NULL)
    {
        exercise.coords[k].x=*pal;
        pal = strtok (NULL," ");
        exercise.coords[k].y=*pal;
        pal = strtok (NULL," ");
        k++;
    }
    return 1;
}

The problem is that the coords that are printed later aren't the same as the given in the sent.

If I input coordinates 1 2 3 4 5 6, it will give me the coordinates 49 50 51 52 53.

Thank you in advance.

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4  
asciitable.com –  user1944441 Mar 23 '13 at 0:56
    
I'm dumber than a mule... Thank you sir. –  user1916860 Mar 23 '13 at 0:58
    
@Armin en.wikipedia.org/wiki/EBCDIC –  undefined behaviour Mar 23 '13 at 1:25
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2 Answers

It's because you get the value of the first character. The value 49 you get is the ASCII value for the character '1'.

You must convert the string to a number, with e.g. strtol.

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Give me two valid reasons I shouldn't use 0x30 in place of '0', and one of those reasons will contradict the use and necessity of "ASCII" in this statement. If that term weren't used to describe character values, there would be far less encouragement to do the wrong thing. –  undefined behaviour Mar 23 '13 at 1:30
    
@modifiablelvalue The OP want normal integer values not strings, so the encoding doesn't really matter (it just happens to be ASCII) just the conversion to integers. –  Joachim Pileborg Mar 23 '13 at 1:38
    
If the encoding is irrelevant or unimportant, then why mention the encoding? Why not mention that it's a character value, instead? –  undefined behaviour Mar 23 '13 at 2:15
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Elaborating upon Joachim Pileborg's answer, pal is a pointer to a character. *pal is a char, which is an integer value representing the character that pal points to. char, is the smallest addressable type of integer.

If you're going to use strtol, it'd be wisest to change your coords to long, so that the types match. The upside is that strtok is pretty lousy at this kind of parsing, and you can completely ditch it.

typedef struct {
    long x;
    long y;
} Coord;

/* returns the number of coordinates read. */
size_t read_coordinates(char *str, Coord destination[], size_t capacity);

int main(void) {
    #define EXERCISE_CAPACITY 1000
    Coord exercise[EXERCISE_CAPACITY];
    size_t count = read_coordinates("1 2 3 4 5 6", exercise, EXERCISE_CAPACITY);
}

size_t read_coordinates(char *str, Coord destination[], size_t capacity) {
    size_t x;
    for (x = 0; x < capacity; x++) {
        char *endptr = NULL;
        destination[x].x=strtol(str, &endptr, 10);
        if (endptr - str == 0) {
            // Stop when strtol says it can't process any more...
            break;
        }
        str = endptr + 1;

        destination[x].y=strtol(str, &endptr, 10);
        if (endptr - str == 0) { break; }
        str = endptr + 1;
    }
    return x;
}

If you must use int as the type for your coords, it would be wise to use sscanf, somewhat like this:

typedef struct {
    int x;
    int y;
} Coord;

/* returns the number of coordinates read. */
size_t read_coordinates(char *str, Coord destination[], size_t capacity);

int main(void) {
    #define EXERCISE_CAPACITY 1000
    Coord exercise[EXERCISE_CAPACITY];
    size_t count = read_coordinates("1 2 3 4 5 6", exercise, EXERCISE_CAPACITY);
}

size_t read_coordinates(char *str, Coord destination[], size_t capacity) {
    size_t x;
    for (x = 0; x < capacity; x++) {
        int n;
        if (sscanf(str, "%d %d%n", &destination[x].x, &destination[x].y, &n) != 2) {
            // Stop when sscanf says it can't process any more...
            break;
        }
        str += n;
    }
    return x;
}
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