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I understand how:

for (int i=0; i<n; i++)

This time complexity is O(n).

for (int i=0; i<n; i++)
    for (int j=0; j<n; j++)
        for (k=0; k<n; k++)

this is O(n^3) right?

i=1
do
    //......
    i++
while (i*2 <n)  

Is this O(n)? Or is it exactly O(n/2)?

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4  
1/2 is a constant. O(n/2) = O(n). –  FatalError Mar 23 '13 at 4:53

4 Answers 4

O(n/2) is O(n) only with a constant coefficient of 1/2. The coefficient can be 10 billion, it would still be O(n), and not e.g. O(n^(1.0001)) which is a different complexity class.

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thank you for your kind answer! –  anna Mar 23 '13 at 5:14

The first one complexity O(n^3), correct. The second one, O(cn), c constant. No matter how huge c is, according to the definition of big-O, the complexity is still O(n).

However, O-notation is considered harmful. See here.

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thank you so much ; ) –  anna Mar 23 '13 at 5:12

The first one of O(n3), you're right.

Your second algorithm is O(n/2) = O(Cn) = O(n). 1/2 is a constant so we can safety discard it.

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oh i see. thank u so much :) –  anna Mar 23 '13 at 5:14

This fragment of code:

i=1
do
    //......
    i++
while (i*2 < n);

is equivalent to that one:

for ( i = 1; i < n / 2 ; ++ i );

Superficially, this is O(n).

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