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I am trying to initialize my SQL database with seed data for four tables which are Property, Person, Address, and Lease. The problem is populating seed data in the Person, Address, and Lease entities. When I run update-database -force from the Package Management Counsel window I get this error "An error occurred while updating the entries. See the inner exception for details". The Property table is the only table out of the four that is populating with seed data after running update-database.

I'm assuming this problem is due to the one-to-one and one-to-many relationships that complicate this database design, and would appreciate any help with an explanation to why my seed data is failing to populate the Lease, Person, and Address entities.

Database Diagram:

enter image description here

protected override void Seed(PropertyContext context)
{   
    GetProperty().ForEach(c => context.Properties.Add(c));
    context.SaveChanges();
    GetAddress().ForEach(c => context.Address.Add(c));
    context.SaveChanges();
    GetTenant().ForEach(c => context.Person.Add(c));
    context.SaveChanges();
    GetLease().ForEach(c => context.Leases.Add(c));
    context.SaveChanges();
}

private static List<Property> GetProperty()
{
    var property = new List<Property> {
        new Property
        {
            PropertyId = 1,
            PropName = "Test",
            Address = "13265 Test St.",
            Bathrooms = 3,
            Bedrooms = 2,
            Garage = 2,
            SqFeet= 1400,
            Notes = "Give me a note",
            DateCreated = DateTime.Now,
        }
    };
    return property;
}

private static List<Address> GetAddress() 
{
    var address = new List<Address>{
        new Address
        {
            AddressId = 1,
            City = "Corona",
            State = "CA",
            ZipCode = "92883"
        }
    };
    return address;
}

private static List<Person> GetTenant()
{ 
    var person = new List<Person>{
        new Person
        {
            PersonId = 1,
            FirstName = "Test",
            LastName = "Man",
            EmailAddress = "test@gmail.com",
            Employer = "Verizonwireless",
            JobTitle = "Baseline Tech",
            PropertyOwner = false,
            Notes = "None",
            DateCreated = DateTime.Now,
            LeaseId = 1
         }
    };
    return person;
}

private static List<Lease> GetLease()
{
    var lease = new List<Lease> {
        new Lease
        {
            LeaseId = 1,

            StartDate =DateTime.Today,
            EndDate = DateTime.Now.AddDays(30),
            LeaseAmount = 1550,
            SecurityDeposit = 1550,
            PetDeposit = 0.0,
            OtherDeposit = 0.0,
            Notes = "None",
            LeaseStatus = "Avialable",
            DateCreated = DateTime.Now,
            PropertyId = 1
         }
    };
    return lease;
}


public class Address
{
    [Key]
    [ForeignKey("Property")]
    public int AddressId { get; set; }

    [Required(ErrorMessage = "City name is required.")]
    [MaxLength(35)]
    public string City { get; set; }

    [Required(ErrorMessage = "State name is required.")]
    [Display(Name = "State")]
    [MaxLength(2)]
    public string State { get; set; }

    [Required(ErrorMessage = "Postal code is required.")]
    [Display(Name = "Zip/Postal Code")]
    [MaxLength(5)]
    public string ZipCode { get; set; }

    public virtual Property Property { get; set; }
}

Model classes that have a one-to-one relation:

public class Address
{
    [Key]
    [ForeignKey("Property")]
    public int AddressId { get; set; }

    [Required(ErrorMessage = "City name is required.")]
    [MaxLength(35)]
    public string City { get; set; }

    [Required(ErrorMessage = "State name is required.")]
    [Display(Name = "State")]
    [MaxLength(2)]
    public string State { get; set; }

    [Required(ErrorMessage = "Postal code is required.")]
    [Display(Name = "Zip/Postal Code")]
    [MaxLength(5)]
    public string ZipCode { get; set; }

    public virtual Property Property { get; set; }
}

 public class Property 
{
    public Property() 
    {
        DateCreated = DateTime.Now;
    }

    public int PropertyId { get; set; }

    [Required(ErrorMessage = "Property name is required.")]
    [Display(Name = "Property Name")]
    [MaxLength(75)]
    public string PropName { get; set; }

    [Required(ErrorMessage = "Property address is required.")]
    [MaxLength(200)]
    public string Address { get; set; }

    [Required(ErrorMessage = "Size of the property is required.")]
    [Display(Name = "SQ Feet")]
    public int SqFeet { get; set; }

    [Required(ErrorMessage = "Number of bedrooms is required. Enter zero for none.")]
    public int Bedrooms { get; set; }

    [Required(ErrorMessage = "Number of bathrooms is required.")]
    public int Bathrooms { get; set; }

    public int Garage { get; set; }   // Stores an index value for a dropdown list

    [MaxLength(500, ErrorMessage = "Max number of characters is 500.")]
    public string Notes { get; set; }

    [Required]
    public DateTime DateCreated { get; set; }

}
share|improve this question
    
How are your primary keys defined? Can we see your code first models? –  FutuToad Mar 23 '13 at 10:49
    
So what's the inner exception? –  Gert Arnold Mar 23 '13 at 15:09
    
@FutuToad - I added the two classes Address and Person that have a one-to-one relation to each other to my original post. –  Shawn Mar 24 '13 at 6:48
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