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I have one view which is built on multiple tables (daily transaction tables) with huge data. I have one Oracle job which pulls the data from this table and if data is not present in the VIEW then it logs an appropriate message -

DECLARE
ln_countOfRecords NUMBER;
BEGIN
      SELECT COUNT(1)
      INTO ln_countOfRecords
      FROM v_view_with_huge_data; --Data is also coming from DBLink tables

      IF ln_countOfRecords > 0
      THEN
         p_log_message('data found');
         --further processing
         ...
         ...
      ELSE
         p_log_message('no data found');
      END IF;
END

Now that select statement is taking longer than expected. Can anyone tell me how to efficiently check if there is at least one record in view.

Please Note: : This is not a duplicate question as I am referring to VIEW and not TABLE.

share|improve this question
2  
The same query would apply to a view as a table, no? –  Shannon Severance Mar 23 '13 at 7:00
1  
No more count(1) please, @paragmeshram -- count(*) is the correct syntax ;) –  David Aldridge Mar 23 '13 at 9:44
1  
@DavidAldridge: there is no difference between count(*) and count(1) (or count('foo') ) –  a_horse_with_no_name Mar 23 '13 at 10:05
1  
@a_horse_with_no_name That's right, but using count(1) implies a belief in the old myth that count() is inefficient because "the database has to read the entire row like in a select * and it's quicker to read 1 than the entire row so count(1) must be more efficient than count()", which is a load of nonsense I'm afraid. –  David Aldridge Mar 23 '13 at 10:16
    
@DavidAldridge: that belief of course is nonsense. –  a_horse_with_no_name Mar 23 '13 at 10:31

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted
DECLARE
    ln_exists NUMBER;
BEGIN
      SELECT COUNT(*)
      INTO ln_exists
      FROM v_view_with_huge_data --Data is also coming from DBLink tables
 /**/ WHERE rownum <= 1 /**/

      IF ln_exists > 0
      THEN
         p_log_message('data found');
         --further processing
         ...
         ...
      ELSE
         p_log_message('no data found');
      END IF;
END
share|improve this answer
1  
@a_horse_with_no_name - I believe once it gets first row it will stop processing. is my understanding right? –  Parag Meshram Mar 23 '13 at 9:06
    
@a_horse_with_no_name I think what Parag is getting at, possibly, is that as soon as a single row has been identified as part of the final result set then then that part of query execution will stop -- so the rownum predicate applies before the count() is taken hence the count() can only return 0 or 1. sqlfiddle.com/#!4/67539/1 –  David Aldridge Mar 23 '13 at 9:41
    
@shannonseverance you might like to change "ln_exists > 0" to "ln_exists = 1" to explicitly acknowledge that it can only be 0 or 1 –  David Aldridge Mar 23 '13 at 9:43
2  
@a_horse_with_no_name check the sqlfiddle please. The count stopkey is actioned before the aggregation. –  David Aldridge Mar 23 '13 at 10:13
    
@DavidAldridge: that's suprising. I would not have expected that. You live and learn... –  a_horse_with_no_name Mar 23 '13 at 10:32

Although I know we all do it (me too, even though I know better :-), DON'T USE COUNT unless you really need to know how many rows exist for your given condition. In your example you don't care how many rows exist, only that one or more exist. A better way to find out if results exist is something like the following:

DECLARE
  nField_value
  bRows_exist        BOOLEAN := FALSE;
BEGIN
  BEGIN
    SELECT some_field_from_view
      INTO nField_value
      FROM v_view_with_huge_data;

    -- Handle the case where only one row exists in the view

    bRows_exist := TRUE;
  EXCEPTION
    WHEN TOO_MANY_ROWS THEN  -- multiple rows exist in the view
      bRows_exist := TRUE;

    WHEN NO_DATA_FOUND THEN  -- no rows in the view
      bRows_exist := FALSE;
  END;

  IF bRows_exist = TRUE THEN
    p_log_message('data found');
    --further processing
         ...
         ...
  ELSE
    p_log_message('no data found');
  END IF;
END;

In certain cases I've found that eliminating a COUNT(*) takes a program that was exhibiting poor performance and makes it an adequate runner.

YMMV.

Share and enjoy.

share|improve this answer
    
I think using ROWNUM is the more elegant solution. –  APC Mar 24 '13 at 6:58
    
@APC - You're right, COUNT(*) with ROWNUM is clearer. I've never run tests (I'd never thought of the idea) and don't have an Oracle instance handy right now. I'm curious to see how using the ROWNUM <= 1 condition affects the plan, and more importantly how it affects execution time. Since ROWNUM isn't assigned until rows start coming out of the query I don't know if it would have any effect or not. (I can hope the optimizer is smart enough to consider it, but...). If I remember I'll try to play with it when I have a chance. –  Bob Jarvis Mar 24 '13 at 12:01
    
What I meant is I think using exceptions to handle normal business conditions is cumbersome (more code) and inexpressive (not so easy to understand what's going on) compared to Shannon's ROWNUM solution. –  APC Mar 24 '13 at 12:20

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