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What is the actual effect of the following construct:

class Base { /* ... */ };

template<class T>
class Derived : public T { /* ... */ };

int main() {
    Derived<const Base> d;
    // ...
}

Does the Derived class only have access to the const-part of the interface of Base? My first tests indicate that there's actually no effect at all. Why?

Thanks!

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marked as duplicate by Joce, Cody Gray, Mark, Denis Tulskiy, Regexident Mar 27 '13 at 14:21

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
I think, that the answer is here: stackoverflow.com/a/13435319/945183 –  jacek.ciach Mar 24 '13 at 0:49
    
I think these questions refer to different things: The linked ones are about template declarations of the form template<const int N> struct test; and my question is about template instantiations whose applied parameters are const types. –  phlipsy Mar 24 '13 at 9:48

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

My guess is that the const is ignored, because if you try to write

class Derived : public const Base

the program doesn't compile.

EDIT:

frozenkoi gave the relevant part of the standard in the comments:

"A typedef-name (7.1.3) that names a class type, or a cv-qualified version thereof, is also a class-name. If a typedef-name that names a cv-qualified class type is used where a class-name is required, the cv-qualifiers are ignored. A typedef-name shall not be used as the identifier in a class-head." §9.1

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You're right, you can't write it explicitly. I guess it's like void func() { return void(); } - writing it explicitly it's completely useless but in the context of templates important as a corner case. –  phlipsy Mar 23 '13 at 9:16
    
I think it has more to do with const being ignored when declaring the type than being ignored in the class declaration. (no c++ standard at hand) but it's along these lines: "The top-level cv-qualifiers on the template-parameter are ignored when determining its type" §14 –  frozenkoi Mar 23 '13 at 10:41
1  
I’m not convinced because that’s just a syntax issue; this compiles: ideone.com/ik41t3 –  Konrad Rudolph Mar 23 '13 at 11:15
4  
I think in that case the relevant part in the spec is "A typedef-name (7.1.3) that names a class type, or a cv-qualified version thereof, is also a class-name. If a typedef-name that names a cv-qualified class type is used where a class-name is required, the cv-qualifiers are ignored. A typedef-name shall not be used as the identifier in a class-head." §9.1 (I have a draft version with me, might be innacurate) –  frozenkoi Mar 23 '13 at 22:18
1  
@frozenkoi A typedef in general definitely does not ignore the const, as is easily verifiable by declaring a variable using the typedef, and attempting to modify it. But I think your standard quote is actually relevant here, put it in an answer. –  Konrad Rudolph Mar 23 '13 at 23:41

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