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The question is more like theoretical.

Preface. Visitor pattern:

class Visitor
{
public:
    virtual void VisitElementA(const ElementA& obj) = 0;
    virtual void VisitElementB(const ElementB& obj) = 0;
};

class Element
{
public:
    virtual void Accept(Visitor& visitor) = 0;
};

class ElementA : public Element
{
public:
    void Accept(Visitor& visitor) override { visitor.VisitElementA(*this); }
};

class ElementB : public Element
{
public:
    void Accept(Visitor& visitor) override { visitor.VisitElementB(*this); }
};

This VisitElementA(const ElementA& obj) looks a little bit ugly, so using overloading we can rewrite it like this:

class Visitor
{
public:
    virtual void Visit(const ElementA& obj) = 0;
    virtual void Visit(const ElementB& obj) = 0;
};

And now we have two identical realisations of Accept method in ElementA and ElementB:

void Accept(Visitor& visitor) override { visitor.Visit(*this); }

And such code must be added to ElementC, ElementD, etc. (if any)

The question is: How to avoid this duplication?

The naive solution to place Accept realisation inside Element class (or some other intermediate class) will not work because of this pointer will point to the object as to the object of class Element, not ElementA or ElementB, and thus in the best case we will get compilation error, or even wrong behaviour (if there will be some overloaded Visit method for Element).

As far as I understand the problem is in trying to mix compile-time and run-time features. But may be exists some template-based solution or new C++11 feature, or something else?

One note: I would be appreciated if you will not offer solution with "macros magic" :).

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can use the CRTP pattern.

Transform the class Element into a template class which takes the derived type as a type parameter. Then you can downcast to the derived type before calling the visitor:

template <typename Derived>
class Element
{
public:
    void Accept(Visitor& visitor) { visitor.Visit(*static_cast<Derived*>(this)); }
};

Finally, each concrete element derives from Element in this way:

class ElementA : public Element<ElementA>
{
};

Notice also that Accept(Visitor&) no longer needs to be virtual.

Update: Here is the solution for the issue that quetzalcoatl pointed out:

class ElementC : public Element<ElementC>, public ElementA
{
public:
    using Element<ElementC>::Accept;
};

Through the using declaration, ElementC brings the Accept name into its scope and, as a consequence, those in the base classes are hidden. However, this Accept is Element<ElementC>::Accept and, in practice, only ElementA::Accept is hidden.

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Yes, that's what I thought about too when I noticed my mixin failure. But CRTP will not work when there's another inheritance deeper than ElementA, i.e. when you have class ElementC : ElementA. This is why I wrote that 'mixing must know the FINAL type' –  quetzalcoatl Mar 23 '13 at 8:47
1  
This definitely will work, I've used such approach while implementing generalised Singleton pattern (just didn't know that it has name) and (such a shame :)) forget about it. Thanks. But if you don't mind I'll wait some more time: may be someone knows better solution. –  cody Mar 23 '13 at 9:00
    
note that the cast is not necessarily safe –  newacct Mar 23 '13 at 9:51
    
@newacct Indeed, but only if you derive from the wrong instantiation of Element (e.g. class ElementB : public Element<ElementA> { /* ... */ };). –  Cassio Neri Mar 23 '13 at 10:07
    
@CassioNeri You can always add some static_assert-like checks to your code. –  Red XIII Mar 23 '13 at 10:30
class Visitor
{
public:
    virtual void Visit(const Element& obj) = 0;
}
class Element
{
public:
    void Accept(Visitor& visitor) { visitor.Visit(*this); }
};

Edit2: You jusst need to invoke the Visit method from your Element base class. Because the Elements are polymorph you still passed the correct object. However you might need a cast if you need to access methods unique for an element or introduce other abstract methods.

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The point of Vistior pattern is to handle different objects differently, so I can't just implement Visit for some Base class, I need different implementation for A, B, C. But still Accept will be identical in all those classes. As for the cast: if it must be done in client - it is not acceptable. –  cody Mar 23 '13 at 8:25
    
I update my answer because I think I misunderstood your question slightly. –  Vash Mar 23 '13 at 8:28
    
vash: I removed my comment, becase I mis-read the original post. In case you managed to read it in the meantime: Author already uses virtual-accept, so that's already dynamic and not trying to get full-static resolution, so my comment was missed –  quetzalcoatl Mar 23 '13 at 8:35

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