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This might be 1/2 Math, 1/2 Programming question. But here we go.

I have a random decimal with 2 decimals. I am going to divide this with a random integer. Then I would like to know the possible maximum rounding diff.

Example:

  decimal number = 100.00M;
  int x = 3;

  var result = number/x;
  var roundedResult = Round(result, 2, MidpointRoundingEx.AwayFromZero);
  // roundedResult = 33.33

  var roundingDiff = number - (roundedResult * x);
  // roundingDiff = 0.01

So I this example the rounding diff is 0.01.

But 'number' can be any number with 2 decimals and 'x' can be any integer. So I would like to know if its possible to put up a formula so I can know the largest rounding diff in any case.

Thanks Thomas

share|improve this question
    
Maybe I'm missing something obvious, but why can't you just use the algorithm you posted? – Matthew Watson Mar 23 '13 at 10:08
    
I would like know know if its possible to mathematical proof the max roundingDiff, given the two inputs. – Thomas Mar 23 '13 at 10:26
    
If you want to proof mathematics then why don't ask your question here math.stackexchange.com ? – Alina B. Mar 23 '13 at 11:06
    
"random decimal with 2 decimals" means there are two digits to the right of the decimal point? – bmm6o Mar 23 '13 at 14:27
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Ok, you want math - let's do fun!

Let's say that d is your random decimal number with two decimals.

We can easily say that

100d = n * x + r, 

where 100d, n, x, r are integers, and 0 <= r < x

so,

d / x = n / 100 + r / 100x

here n / 100 will always be "good" from rounding perspective, so we are interesting in "r / x" part, as it is the only part which affects rounding:

0 <= r / x < 1,
0 <= r / 100x < 0.01

If r / 100x >= 0.005, it adds 0.01 to rounded result. This is the same as r / x >= 1/2, which is the same as r >= x / 2

Ok, so (d / x) rounded is either

(1) n / 100, when r < x / 2, or
(2) n / 100 + 0.01, when r >= x / 2

Rounded difference is

diff = d - (n / 100) * x              for (1), or
diff = d - (n / 100) * x + 0.01 * x   for (2)

as of

(n / 100) * x  = d - r/100

we have that max diff will be for (2):

max diff = r / 100 + 0.01 * x = (r + x) / 100

but as we know

x / 2 <= r < x,

so max diff will be for maximum r: (*)

max diff = 2 * x * 0.01 = x / 200

As you see, we still depending on particular x, so we need to have some estimate on it. If it is completely random - we can have any rounding diff up to d itself.

If for example we say x < d then we have max diff = d / 200

And to add programming part:

        decimal number = 100.00M;

        decimal max = decimal.MinValue;
        decimal min = decimal.MaxValue;

        int maxX = 0;
        int minX = 0;

        for (int x = 1; x <= number; x++)
        {
            var result = number / x;
            var roundedResult = Math.Round(result, 2, MidpointRounding.AwayFromZero);
            var roundingDiff = number - (roundedResult * x);
            if (roundingDiff < min)
            {
                min = roundingDiff;
                minX = x;
            }
            if (roundingDiff > max)
            {
                max = roundingDiff;
                maxX = x;
            }
        }

        Console.WriteLine("Max is {0} for {1}", max, maxX);
        Console.WriteLine("Min is {0} for {1}", min, minX);
        Console.WriteLine("Delta is {0}", max - min);
        Console.WriteLine("d / 200 = {0}", number / 200);

We have output:

Max is 0.40 for 83
Min is -0.44 for 93
Delta is 0.84
d / 200 = 0.50

Why not exactly 0.5? Because in (*) we had implicit assumption that r can be x/2 for any x, which is not true, but hopefully it is enough for you purposes.

share|improve this answer

You can calculate diff using this one-liner formula:

var roundingDiff = ((int)(number * 100) % x - ((int)(number * 100) % x + x / 2) / x * x) / 100M;

For given x, the max rounding diff is x / 200

share|improve this answer

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