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How can I maintain the order of actual list after counting its occurrence using a hash in the following program? For example, <DATA> are

a
b
e
a
c 
d 
a
c
d
b
etc.

Using hash, i counted the occurrence of each element.

and what i want is:

a  3
b  2
e  1
c  2
d  2

but the following program shows me otherwise.

my (%count, $line, @array_1, @array_2);
while ($line = <DATA>) {
    $count{$line}++ if ( $line =~ /\S/ );
}
@array_1 = keys(%count);
@array_2 = values(%count);
for(my $i=0; $i<$#array_1; $i++)
{
   print "$array_1[$i]\t $array_2[$i]";
}
share|improve this question
    
Can you please tag your code, to read it easily. –  Space Oct 13 '09 at 7:25
    
So, you have asked five questions, received a bunch of answers to all of them and none of them has been good enough to be accepted, is that it? –  Sinan Ünür Oct 13 '09 at 19:35
    
@Sinan: No... its not that...... i couldnot find the place to acknowledge all wonderful answers.... just wondering either it is done by adding a comment or is there other place..... a newbie to stackoverflow as well as perl... Sorry, May be i should take some time to learn how to take part actively in this platform... Almost all the answers gave me a new idea to learn...and served my purposes... –  Cthar Oct 14 '09 at 3:53
    
@Cthar - you should pick the answer that fits your question the best (also taking into account how well written and easy to understand it is) and accept it by clicking the tick adjacent to the question. You can give credit to other good answers by upvoting them. Of course positive comments are also welcome. Doing these things helps others to find the best answers and also rewards those that help you. –  harmic Jan 13 '14 at 6:20

6 Answers 6

Hashes are not ordered, but as usual, CPAN offers a solution: Tie::IxHash

use Tie::IxHash;
my %count;
tie %count, 'Tie::IxHash';

while ($line = <DATA>) {
$count{$line}++ if ( $line =~ /\S/ );
}

while( my( $key, $value)= each %count) {
    print "$key\t $value"; 
}
share|improve this answer

Data in a hash table is stored in order of the keys' hash code, which for most purposes is like a random order. You also want to store the order of the first appearance of each key. Here's one way to approach this problem:

my (%count, $line, @display_order);
while ($line = <DATA>) {
    chomp $line;           # strip the \n off the end of $line
    if ($line =~ /\S/) {
        if ($count{$line}++ == 0) {
            # this is the first time we have seen the key "$line"
            push @display_order, $line;
        }
    }
}

# now @display_order holds the keys of %count, in the order of first appearance
foreach my $key (@display_order)
{
    print "$key\t $count{$key}\n";
}
share|improve this answer
3  
IMHO this is a better solution than using Tie::IxHash, which I think is beyond the OP's original needs. It is more suitable to use the display order of the keys, as in this answer, or to use foreach my $key (sort keys %count) { ... } –  Ether Oct 13 '09 at 15:33

Simply:

my (%count, @order);
while(<DATA>) {
  chomp;
  push @order, $_ unless $count{$_}++;
}
print "$_ $count{$_}\n" for @order;
__DATA__
a
b
e
a
c
d
a
c
d
b
share|improve this answer

From perlfaq4's answer to "How can I make my hash remember the order I put elements into it?"


How can I make my hash remember the order I put elements into it?

Use the Tie::IxHash from CPAN.

use Tie::IxHash;

tie my %myhash, 'Tie::IxHash';

for (my $i=0; $i<20; $i++) {
	$myhash{$i} = 2*$i;
	}

my @keys = keys %myhash;
# @keys = (0,1,2,3,...)
share|improve this answer

Another option is David Golden's (@xdg) simple pure perl Hash::Ordered module. You gain order but it is slower since the hash becomes an object behind the scenes and use methods for accessing and modifying hash elements.

There are probably benchmarks that can quantify just how much slower the module is than regular hashes but it's a cool way to work with key/value data structures in small scripts and fast enough for me in that sort of application. The documentation mentions several other approaches to ordering a hash as well.

share|improve this answer

I'm not convinced that this is always a better technique, but I have used it sometimes. Instead of just having the "seen" type of hash, it can store both the count and order noticed.

Basically, instead of $count{$line} having the number of times seen, $count{$line}{count} is the times seen and $count{$line}{order} is the order in which it was seen.

my %count;
while (my $line = <DATA>) {
    chomp $line;
    if ($line =~ /\S/) {
        $count{$line} ||= { order => scalar(keys(%count)) };
        $count{$line}{count}++;
    }
}

for my $line (sort { $count{$a}{order} <=> $count{$b}{order} } keys %count ) {
    print "$line $count{$line}{count}\n";
}
share|improve this answer

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