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I have written a simple guessing game and a method to guess it...

    from gasp import *

    number = random_between(1, 1000)
    guesses = 0

    while True:
        guess = input("Guess the number between 1 and 1000: ")
        guesses += 1
        if guess > number:
            print "Too high!"
        elif guess < number:
            print "Too low!"
        else:
            print "\n\nCongratulations, you got it in %d guesses!\n\n" % guesses
            break

Now according to the question the max number of guesses should be equal to 11 if the proper strategy is used.I used binary search to get the right number, but the the number of guesses are never more than 10. To check I did the following and it produced a non terminating loop.

    from gasp import *


    guesses = 0
    big = 1000
    small = 1
    while guesses != 11
        number = random_between(1, 1000)
        while True:
            guess = (big + small) / 2
            guesses += 1
            if guess > number:
                print "Too high!"
                big = guess
            elif guess < number:
                print "Too low!"
                small = guess
            else:
                print "\n\nCongratulations, you got it in %d guesses!\n\n" % guesses
                break

So who is right am I making some mistake or the number of guesses required can't be more than 10 and the question is wrong.

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You should use int(raw_input(...)) instead of input(...). The input() function in Python 2.x is unsafe, avoid it. (In Python 3.x, it is safe.) –  Dietrich Epp Mar 23 '13 at 11:53
    
@DietrichEpp Yes, in regards to a comment previously made by the OP, input is not just ints, it can take any python code to evaluate which is of course dangerous –  jamylak Mar 23 '13 at 12:17

2 Answers 2

Let's see:

A number between 1 and  1 requires 1 guess
A number between 1 and  3 requires 2 guesses at most
A number between 1 and  7 requires 3 guesses at most
A number between 1 and 15 requires 4 guesses at most
A number between 1 and 31 requires 5 guesses at most
...

In other words, n guesses are enough to cover the range from 1 to (2**n)-1.

For n=10, this range is from 1 to 1023. Since 1023 >= 1000, your conclusion about ten guesses is correct.

That said, the code you used to verify this conclusion is buggy, since it fails to re-initialize big and small and guesses whenever you move on to the next number. Also, instead of generating the numbers randomly, you could just test every number between 1 and 1000 and have a deterministic algorithm with finite runtime.

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thank you...... –  user2189524 Mar 23 '13 at 11:45
>>> from math import log, ceil
>>> ceil(log(1000, 2))
10.0
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