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Why the overload resolution for the call max(x, y) in the expression return max(max(x, y), z); below results in a call to the non-template function char const* max(char const*, char const*) ?

As far as I can understand, the function max<const char*>(x, y) is a better fit than the former, as x is a const char* const& and y is a const char* const& !

#include <iostream>

template <typename T>
T const& max (T const& x, T const& y)
{
    return x < y ? y : x;
}

char const* max (char const* x, char const* y)
{
    return std::strcmp(x, y) < 0 ? y : x;
}

template <typename T>
T const& max (T const& x, T const& y, T const& z)
{
    return max (max(x, y), z);
}

int main ()
{
    const char* sx = "String_x";
    const char* sy = "String_y";
    const char* sz = "String_z";
    max(sx, sy, sz);
}
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marked as duplicate by Bo Persson, Joce, Vishal, Richard Brown, p.s.w.g Mar 24 '13 at 4:03

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
@BoPersson The two functions in this example don't have the same signature. –  J.A. Belloc Mar 23 '13 at 12:20

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Why the overload resolution for the call max(x, y) in the expression return max(max(x, y), z); below results in a call to the non-template function char const* max(char const*, char const*)?

When invoking this function:

template <typename T>
T const& max (T const& x, T const& y, T const& z)
{
    return max (max(x, y), z);
}

T is deduced to be const char*. Therefore, this signature is instantiated:

const char* const& max (
    const char* const& x, 
    const char* const& y, 
    const char* const& z
    )

The function internally calls the binary version of max() with arguments of type const char*. Both the template and the non-template overload are viable for an argument of type const char*.

However, when two functions are viable for resolving the call and one of them is not a template, the non-template version is considered a best fit.

Per Paragraph 13.3.3/1 of the C++11 Standard:

Given these definitions,** a viable function F1 is defined to be a better function than another viable function F2 if** for all arguments i, ICSi(F1) is not a worse conversion sequence than ICSi(F2), and then

— for some argument j, ICSj(F1) is a better conversion sequence than ICSj(F2), or, if not that,

— the context is an initialization by user-defined conversion (see 8.5, 13.3.1.5, and 13.3.1.6) and the standard conversion sequence from the return type of F1 to the destination type (i.e., the type of the entity being initialized) is a better conversion sequence than the standard conversion sequence from the return type of F2 to the destination type. [ ... ] or, if not that,

F1 is a non-template function and F2 is a function template specialization, or, if not that,

— F1 and F2 are function template specializations, and the function template for F1 is more specialized than the template for F2 according to the partial ordering rules described in 14.5.6.2.

This explains why the non-template overload is picked.

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There is no conversion for the template function –  J.A. Belloc Mar 23 '13 at 12:12
1  
This means those overloads are equally good That's what I'm trying to understand. As I said before, to use the non-template function there a conversion, whereas for the template function the match is perfect. –  J.A. Belloc Mar 23 '13 at 12:27
1  
@user1042389: Of course the non-template function is chosen, that's what I explained in my answer. There is ambiguity in my example, but again: if one of the two functions is made a template, the ambiguity is resolved by picking the non-template version. This is what my answer tells. –  Andy Prowl Mar 23 '13 at 12:40
1  
@AndyProwl I've just realized that in your first example you have changed the code. But my question is the same as before. Considering your code, why would there be an ambiguity given that max(const char* const&, const char* const&) is a better fit for the call max(x, y) than max(const char*, max const char*), as the former is a perfect match and the last requires a conversion ? –  J.A. Belloc Mar 23 '13 at 12:50
1  
@user1042389: You can disregard the & for the argument, because when the expression is evaluated, the & is ignored - see Paragraph 5/6: "If an expression initially has the type “reference to T” (8.3.2, 8.5.3), the type is adjusted to T prior to any further analysis. The expression designates the object or function denoted by the reference, and the expression is an lvalue or an xvalue, depending on the expression.". So what remains is a qualification adjustment from const int to int, and this counts as an Exact Match (see Table 12 of Paragraph 13.3.3.1.1/3) –  Andy Prowl Mar 23 '13 at 13:04

Argument Matching - Overloaded functions are selected for the best match of function declarations in the current scope.

If template argument deduction succeeds, then the generated function is compared with the other functions to determine the best match, following the rules for overload resolution

 

  • An exact match was found.

  • A trivial conversion was performed.

  • An integral promotion was performed.

  • A standard conversion to the desired argument type exists.

  • A user-defined conversion (either conversion operator or constructor) to the desired argument type exists.

  • Arguments represented by an ellipsis were found.

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For the template function there is no conversion. That's why I think it should be called instead of the non-template. –  J.A. Belloc Mar 23 '13 at 12:10

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