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I was trying a tiny code with if statement, although it is very simple,but there is something I really confused here is the code

n<-857
while(n!=1){
if(n<=0)
 print("please input a positive integer")
else if(n%%2==0)
 n<-n/2
 print(n)
else
 n<-3*n+1
 print(n)
  }

as we see above,when running this code in R, there comes the error,but if I change the if statement like this

if(n<=0)
     print("please input a positive integer")
    else if(n%%2==0)
     n<-n/2
    else
     n<-3*n+1

it is ok ,my question is that can we only write one line under each judgement? if I want to do something more after each judge, what should I do ,just like this case, I want to change the value of n,but also want to display it, what should I do? thank you very much

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5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

To be precise, this is not about lines but about statements. You can have the whole if else statement in one line:

> if (TRUE) 1 else 3
[1] 1

A statement will end at the end of the line (if complete), you can see that nicely in interactive mode if you enter the code line by line:

> if (TRUE) 
+ 1
[1] 1
> else
Fehler: Unerwartete(s) 'else' in "else" # error: unexpected 'else' in "else"
> 3
[1] 3

if can come in form if (condition) statement or if (condition) statement else other.statement, the interpreter assumes the first version is meant if the statement is complete after line 2 - in interactive mode it cannot sensibly wait whether an else appears next. This is different in sourced code - there it is clear with the next line which form it is.

Semicolons end statements as well:

> if (TRUE) 1; else 3
[1] 1
Fehler: Unerwartete(s) 'else' in " else"  # error: unexpected 'else' in "else"

But you can only have one statement in each branch of the condition.

> if (TRUE) 1; 2 else 3
[1] 1
Fehler: Unerwartete(s) 'else' in " 2 else" # error: unexpected 'else' in "2 else"

Curly braces group statements so they appear as one statement.

> if (TRUE) {1; 2} else 3
[1] 2
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thank you for your kindly replay, I will continue see the help file, the skill in R is so beautiful –  TOPMAD Mar 24 '13 at 1:59

You have to use {} for allows the if statement to have more than one line. Try this:

n<-857
while(n!=1){
  if(n<=0){
    print("please input a positive integer")
  }

  else if(n%%2==0){
    n<-n/2
    print(n)
  }
    else {
      n<-3*n+1
      print(n)
    }
}
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1  
thank you very much –  TOPMAD Mar 23 '13 at 12:14
1  
This only works because it is in a while loop. From the R Language Definition: "When the if statement is not in a block the else, if present, must appear on the same line as the end of statement2. Otherwise the new line at the end of statement2 completes the if and yields a syntactically complete statement that is evaluated. A simple solution is to use a compound statement wrapped in braces, putting the else on the same line as the closing brace that marks the end of the statement." –  GSee Mar 23 '13 at 15:19
    
@Gsee, thanks for pulling up that reference. –  Ricardo Saporta Mar 24 '13 at 0:22

To group statements, surround them with curly braces as you've done with the while loop:

if(n<=0) {
     print("please input a positive integer")
} else if(n%%2==0) {
     n<-n/2
     print(n)
} else {
     n<-3*n+1
     print(n)
}

This will allow you to place multiple statements inside the if, the else if and the final else.

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thanks a million it is very kind of you guys –  TOPMAD Mar 23 '13 at 12:11
    
thank you very much –  TOPMAD Mar 24 '13 at 2:00

while the direct answer is, as has been noted, to use curly braces;
it is worth adding that you can integrate the <- assignment operator into many functions.

In your specific case:

    print(n <- 3*n+1)

   ## instead of 
   #  n <- 3*n+1
   #  print(n)


note that using = here will NOT work. It must be <-

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It isn't a problem for this example, but the assignment will only occur if the argument is actually evaluated in the function. The effect is as if the expression is passed to the function, rather than the value (as it would be in C/C++). Example: g <- function(x) {} ; n <- 1; g(n <- 2); n –  Matthew Lundberg Mar 23 '13 at 13:46
    
@MatthewLundberg, absolutely. That's why I qualified my statement indicating that it works with many functions. :) –  Ricardo Saporta Mar 24 '13 at 2:38

Ever heard of curly barces?

n<-857
while(n!=1){
    if(n<=0) {
        print("please input a positive integer")
    } else if(n%%2==0) {
        n<-n/2
        print(n)
    } else {
        n<-3*n+1
        print(n)
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
thank you wish you have a good day –  TOPMAD Mar 23 '13 at 12:11
    
it looks like this answer has a lot of downvotes. I wonder why that is? –  Ricardo Saporta Mar 23 '13 at 13:40
1  
@RicardoSaporta snarky comment? no explanation? [I didn't downvote by the way] Shame people don't leave comments when they downvote... –  Gavin Simpson Mar 23 '13 at 14:01
    
Thanks for the upvotes. It wasn't meant to come over that snarky. Was probably more a case of fortune(271). –  Henrik Mar 23 '13 at 14:13
3  
right on. Yet, by the very example that the OP gave, s/he clearly has heard of curly braces. The issue is one of knowing how to use them correctly. Guessing by the many downvotes of a seemingly 'technically-correct' answer, it seems that the snarknyness is pretty apparent. –  Ricardo Saporta Mar 23 '13 at 14:17

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