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Hy every one , while doing some experiments using fork and signal , i have came across a program that shows very interesting behavior but after struggling hours with it , i couldn't figure out what is happening.

What i am trying to do is i am creating a child process inside the main body and then printing "hello world" and then calling exit. After this it is totally understood that its signal handler will get called and also the parent process that is blocked by wait system call will also get called. Now i am creating another process in the signal handler but from there on, the output goes infinite.

Output is this: Hello world Come to Linux Come to UNIX Come to Linux Come to UNIX Come to Linux Come to UNIX ...

Also why does come to Linux printed again and again.

Also please tell me when fork get called , i know the duplicate address space is made of the parent but what about the signal handlers. Do they get duplicate too. In my case when child calls exit. Then signal handler that's get called is of child or parent.

Please help. Thanks.

void sig_handler(int signo)
{
if(fork() == 0){

}
else{
    int pid = 0;
    wait(&pid);
    printf("Come to unix");
    fflush(stdout);
}
 }


int main()
{
if (signal(SIGCHLD, sig_handler) == SIG_ERR){
}

int child_pid;
int i;

child_pid = fork();
switch (child_pid) {
    case -1:         
        perror("fork");
        exit(1);
    case 0:          
        printf("hello world\n");fflush(stdout);        
        exit(0);
    default:
        wait(&i);
        printf("Come to linux");
        exit(0);
        //break;
}

return 0;
}
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2 Answers 2

Is it not obvious that it will go in an infinite loop? You have created a SIGCHLD handler and then in that handler you fork again and wait for the child to exit. Basically when the child in that handler exits the parent again goes into the handler. The below code should avoid it. At the start of the signal handler avoid the signal by setting it to default.

void sig_handler(int signo) {
     signal (SIGCHLD, SIG_IGN);
    if(fork() == 0){ 

    }   
    else{
        int pid = 0;
        wait(&pid);
        printf("Come to unix");
        fflush(stdout);
    }    
}

Also, you could only call async signal safe routines in a signal handler to avoid undefined behavior. I am not sure if printf and fflush are sync safe or not. Even though making the above change avoids the looping the program could still have undefined behavior. I guess fork is async safe

See below a discussion that might be helpful: http://sourceware.org/bugzilla/show_bug.cgi?id=4737

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Calling fork(2) in a signal handler has undefined behaviour according to the POSIX-standard, so just don't do it :)

See: http://pubs.opengroup.org/onlinepubs/009695399/functions/fork.html.

share|improve this answer
    
thX a lot. but there should some reason to it. –  Umair Khalid Mar 23 '13 at 13:08
    
To figure that out you have to look at how fork and signals are implemented in your OS, this will vary, probably even between versions. My guess is, that your OS calls the signal handler again each time it reaches the end of it (in the child process). –  jbr Mar 23 '13 at 13:12
    
Try outputting something in the child-part of the signal handler, that should indicate if I'm right. –  jbr Mar 23 '13 at 13:19

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