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It's hard to describe without code so here goes: I'm trying to prototype an object (b) in the header file of another(a), then in the constructor of (a) call (b)'s constructor and pass it values, so i can then use the methods of b which depend on its constructor and the values passed to it, but the way im doing gives: red underlined in the open bracket of pricing's constructor says: "no default constructor exists for monteCarlo" and then on the next line m is underlined red saying: "call of object of a class type without appropriate operator() or conversion functionsto pointer-to-function type". Any other critic of my program is very welcome, i am trying to learn to program, and well.

in the file pricing.cpp i have:

#include "pricing.h"
#include <math.h>
#include <vector>
pricing::pricing(void)
{
 m(10,0.0,0.01,50);
}
double pricing::expectedValue(void)
{
expectedExValue = m.samplePaths[2][3]; //yes this isn't an expected value, 
// its just for illustration purposes/making it compile.
return 0;
}

in pricing.h i have:

#pragma once
#include "pricing.h"
#include "monteCarlo.h"
class pricing
{
public:
pricing(void);
~pricing(void);
double euroCall();
std::vector<double> samplePathing;
double expectedValue();
    monteCarlo m;

};

then montecarlo.cpp looks like:

#include "monteCarlo.h"
#include "randomWalk.h"
#include <vector>
#include <iostream>

monteCarlo::monteCarlo(int trails, double drift, double volidatity, int density)
{
for (int i = 0; i < trails; i++)
{
    std::cout << "Trail number " << i+1 <<  std::endl;
    randomWalk r(drift,volidatity,density);
    r.seed();
    samplePaths.emplace_back(r.samplePath);
    std::cout << std::endl << std::endl;
}
}


monteCarlo::~monteCarlo(void)
{
}

and finally montecarlo.h is:

#pragma once
#include <vector>

class monteCarlo
{
public:
monteCarlo(int, double, double, int);
~monteCarlo(void);
std::vector< std::vector<double> > samplePaths;
};
share|improve this question
    
Welcome to stackoverflow! Please consider a title that describes the problem a bit better. That way, you'll probably get more attention and better answers. – Sentry Mar 23 '13 at 13:32
    
There is no reason to include a header from itself. I would remove the #include "pricing.h" from pricing.h. – Torsten Robitzki Mar 23 '13 at 13:36
    
Ah yeah thank you, i think this must of been while i was adding header files, i started off not using them. Trying to get better at actually programming well rather than just get the job done so this is a learning process :) Thanks for renaming the question too, wasn't sure what a good title was – Rob Spencer Mar 23 '13 at 15:33
pricing::pricing(void)
{
 m(10,0.0,0.01,50);
}

This attempts to call m as though it were a function (if it had overloaded operator(), you would be able to do this, which is what the error is talking about). To initialise m instead, use the member initialization list:

pricing::pricing(void)
 : m(10,0.0,0.01,50)
{ }

This colon syntax is used to initialise members of an object in the constructor. You simply list members by their names and initialize them with either ( expression-list ) or { initializer-list } syntax.

share|improve this answer
    
@OP yep, this shall do it – TravellingGeek Mar 23 '13 at 13:36
    
Thank you very much! – Rob Spencer Mar 23 '13 at 15:26

pricing.cpp

#include "pricing.h"

pricing::pricing() 
  : m(10,0.0,0.01,50) 
{
}

double pricing::expectedValue()
{
    return m.samplePaths[2][3]; 
}

pricing.h

#ifndef PRICING_H
#define PRICING_H
#include "monteCarlo.h"
#include <vector>

class pricing
{
public:
    pricing();
    double euroCall();
    std::vector<double> samplePathing;
    double expectedValue();
private:
    monteCarlo m;
};

#endif

montecarlo.cpp looks like:

#include "monteCarlo.h"
#include "randomWalk.h"
#include <iostream>

monteCarlo::monteCarlo(int trails, double drift, double volidatity, int density)
{
    for (int i = 0; i < trails; i++)
    {
        std::cout << "Trail number " << i+1 <<  std::endl;
        randomWalk r(drift,volidatity,density);
        r.seed();
        samplePaths.emplace_back(r.samplePath);
        std::cout << "\n" << std::endl;
    }
}

and finally montecarlo.h is:

#ifndef MONTECARLO_H
#define MONTECARLO_H
#include <vector>

class monteCarlo
{
public:
    monteCarlo(int, double, double, int);
    std::vector< std::vector<double> > samplePaths;
};

#endif

I would use some very basic rules:

  1. use include guards
  2. Include only headers that are really needed in headers
  3. Include the header as the first file in the implementation.
  4. Do not use "using namespace" in a header
  5. If possible, use forward declarations instead of includes

3) makes sure, that the header contains all necessary include files

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks very much for the answer :) I actually have #pragma once at the top of each header file, should this be suffice for header guards? – Rob Spencer Mar 23 '13 at 15:29
    
@RobSpencer include guards are more portable – Torsten Robitzki Mar 23 '13 at 16:29

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