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Why does this give me a compile time error Cannot convert 'ListCompetitions' to 'TOperation':

public class ListCompetitions : IOperation
{
}

public TOperation GetOperation<TOperation>() where TOperation : IOperation
{
    return (TOperation)new ListCompetitions(); 
}

Yet this is perfectly legal:

public TOperation GetOperation<TOperation>() where TOperation : IOperation
{
    return (TOperation)(IOperation)new ListCompetitions(); 
}
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1  
A Giraffe is a kind of animal. Gerry is a giraffe. In the next sentence, "T" can be replaced with any kind of animal. Gerry the giraffe is a T. Now do you see the problem? The only valid values for T that make that sentence true are "giraffe" and "animal", but T can be any kind of animal. –  Eric Lippert Mar 23 '13 at 15:11
    
Thanks Eric, that makes sense (though I would have thought it could still be a runtime error, rather than compiler error, though I'm sure there is a deeper reason why you guys implemented it that way that eludes me..) –  MalcomTucker Mar 25 '13 at 14:41

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Because TOperation could be anything that implements IOperation, you can't be sure that ListCompetitions is a TOperation.

You probably want to be returning an IOperation:

public IOperation GetOperation<TOperation>() where TOperation : IOperation
{
    return new ListCompetitions(); 
}
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In that case, what is the purpose the the generic parameter TOperation? –  svick Mar 23 '13 at 22:29
    
Svick - In the actual code TOperation will be a more specific version of IOperation and this will be a factory method that returns the correct concrete. –  MalcomTucker Mar 25 '13 at 14:39

This cast is not safe since you could supply a generic argument different from ListCompetitions for TOperation, for example you could have:

public class OtherOperation : IOperation { }
OtherOperation op = GetOperation<OtherOperation>();

If the compiler allowed your method, this would fail at runtime.

You could add a new constraint e.g.

public TOperation GetOperation<TOperation>() where TOperation : IOperation, new()
{
    return new TOperation();
}

alternatively you could change the return type to IOperation:

public IOperation GetOperation()
{
    return new ListCompetitions();
}

It's not clear what the benefit of using generics is in this case from your example.

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You're casting to TOperation, not IOperation. –  Daniel Imms Mar 23 '13 at 13:43
    
@IlyaIvanov - He's casting to TOperation not IOperation. –  Lee Mar 23 '13 at 13:43
    
yeap, didn't catch immediately the difference in I and T, +1 –  Ilya Ivanov Mar 23 '13 at 13:44
1  
Ignore the usage, this is a cut down example. Why not allow the runtime failure as with other casts? Why allow me to do this: ` (TOperation)(IOperation)new ListCompetitions();` ? –  MalcomTucker Mar 23 '13 at 13:46
    
@MalcomTucker You can cast “up” and you can cast “down”, but you can't directly cast “sideways”. –  svick Mar 23 '13 at 22:32

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