Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I wonder whether a red black tree should have at least one red node. Also, given a BST, if we can convert it into an RBT, is there a unique way to turn this tree into a red-black tree?

share|improve this question

closed as off topic by Raymond Chen, Jim Mischel, jamylak, Luc M, Gilles Mar 23 '13 at 18:52

Questions on Stack Overflow are expected to relate to programming within the scope defined by the community. Consider editing the question or leaving comments for improvement if you believe the question can be reworded to fit within the scope. Read more about reopening questions here. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

A quick glance at the properties of a red-black tree shows that there is no requirement for any node to be red. The only way red nodes come about is through property 5:

Every simple path from a given node to any of its descendant leaves contains the same number of black nodes.

This property is also satisfied by any perfect binary tree, so every perfect binary search tree with only black nodes is also a red-black tree. (I'm not sure if the textbook red-black tree algorithms ever produce these, though.)

Also, given a BST, if we can convert it into an RBT, is there a unique way to turn this tree into a red-black tree?

There is no single unique RBT for an arbitrary BST; there are always multiple equivalent RBTs, except for very shallow trees.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answer! –  user2110714 Mar 23 '13 at 14:12