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Because of performance purposes I put loading of jQuery scripts at the bottom of the page (just before the closing body tag).

My question is how to enable page specific scripts? I don't want to put everything inside $(document).ready method (again because of performance purposes).

Update: I'm using a template system so I put jQuery loading in the template. That way jQuery calls don't get recognized even if I put them at the end of a specific page because jQuery is not loaded at that point.

share|improve this question
    
you really don't understand what you're asking do you? Would you like some real-time support in solving this? Then I suggest you visit chat.stackoverflow.com/rooms/17/javascript and mention the URL of this post (as a single message, just paste the URL of this window) and that you don't understand $(document).ready() – jcolebrand Dec 20 '10 at 21:33

I'm not 100% sure what you're asking, but if it's what I think it is, the answer is that you can't have your cake and eat it too.

It seems that you've moved jQuery to the button of the page but have some elements of the page that you want to use JavaScript on, but don't want to wait for document.ready for all of the? Maybe something like the following?

<html>
<body>
   <ul id="maybe-some-menu-that-needs-js-initialization-for-example">
   ...
   </ul>
   <script>
     /* javascript goes here that uses jquery for the above menu (or whatever) 
     AND you don't want to wait for document.ready for this to happen */
   </script>
   ...
   <script src="including jquery here"></script>
   <script src="including other scripts here"></script>
</body>
</html>

If that's the case, then refer to what I said from the get-go. You'll have to move jQuery (at least the library, not necessarily all your other JavaScript) back to the top of the page. Either that or don't us jQuery for the things you don't want to wait for document.ready for.

Edit: If you want to perform actions based on the page that you are, then there are two methods, each better and more preferable then the last.

  1. Use location.pathname to determine what functionality you need.
  2. Organize your JavaScript into separate, modular files by their functionality and include only those that are needed for the specific page.
share|improve this answer
    
I'm aware that this cannot be done but is there any other way to perform actions only on specific pages? – Strudel Oct 13 '09 at 9:40
    
^^ something like if (page_003) then call method3 ? – Strudel Oct 13 '09 at 9:41
    
Here is an example of what I mean: artzstudio.com/2009/04/jquery-performance-rules/… – Strudel Oct 13 '09 at 11:06
    
I'm not quite sure what you mean by location.pathname. Can you explain that a little bit? – Strudel Oct 15 '09 at 6:20
    
location.pathname will give you the path of the page. For example, for this page, it is "/questions/1558816/using-jquery-put-at-the-bottom-of-the-page-on-specific-page‌​/1559027" – Justin Johnson Oct 15 '09 at 7:25

The $(document).ready() will not be overridden when using it more than once, so you can load 2 script files that both adds functionality to be run when the document is loaded.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your answer. I updated the question. – Strudel Oct 13 '09 at 8:36

using $(document).ready, it doesn't matter where in the page it is, as it will only execute when the DOM has finished loading. The only code that should go inside $(document).ready is code that needs to be set up when the DOM has loaded, e.g. event handlers, any effects/animations that you want to run as soon as the DOM has finished loading, etc. Other functions do not need to be in $(document).ready, such as a function used in sorting an array, named functions called when events are raised, etc.

As has been pointed out, you can have more than one $(document).ready function on a page, as what you are doing is specifying a function (named or anonymous) to execute when the ready event (a jQuery event) is raised.

EDIT:

That article that you have linked to in the comments on this answer provides and example of what you are trying to achieve. As an example, you would have a JavaScript file with the following setup to declare a global variable

var myPageLibrary = {
    homePage : {

        init : function() {
            $(document).ready(function() {
                /* page specific functions that need to run,
                   for exmaple, binding event handlers, etc */
            });
        }
    },
    aboutPage : {
        init : function() {
            $(document).ready(function() {
                /* page specific functions that need to run,
                   for exmaple, binding event handlers, etc */
            });
        }
    }
}

/* you might have functions here that are bound to events. 
   Here is an example */

function showSubMenu(e) {
    $(e.target).next('div').show();
}

function hideSubMenu(e) {
    $(e.target).next('div').hide();
}

Then in your pages, you would have the following structure (this example uses the home page)

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN"
  "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd">
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" xml:lang="en" lang="en">
<head>
<meta http-equiv="Content-type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8" />
<title>This is my Home Page</title>
<script src="http://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.3.2/jquery.min.js"></script>
<script src="path-to-myPageLibrary.js"></script>
<script type="text/javascript">
    myPageLibrary.homePage.init(); 
</script>
</head>
<body>
  <!-- Page content -->
</body>
</html>

with jQuery script file referenced first, followed by myPageLibrary script file, followed by the script block calling myPageLibrary.homePage.init();

share|improve this answer
    
I'm aware of this. The problem is if you put jQuery library at the bottom of the page. That way jQurey code won't get recognized if it's anywhere above. – Strudel Oct 13 '09 at 9:43
    
Yes, the jQuery script needs to be referenced before any code that uses it. This is the same for any JavaScript function that is a property of the global object (as jQuery is) - it needs to be declared before you can use it – Russ Cam Oct 13 '09 at 9:59
    
I really liked your PageLibrary approach thanks. – mcaaltuntas Mar 14 '10 at 19:34
up vote 1 down vote accepted

This allows you to call jQuery plugin methods in the body and load jQuery plugin on to bottom of the page headjs

share|improve this answer
    
Hi @Strudel, I'm really confused by your answer**. Can you put a little more effort into explaining what you mean by this link? Did you mean this was what you accepted the answer to be? – jcolebrand Dec 20 '10 at 21:31
    
Hi @drachenstern, sorry for the crappy answer. This allows you to call jQuery plugin methods in the body and load jQuery plugin on to bottom of the page. – Strudel Mar 24 '11 at 13:10
    
There is also labjs project. – user1300959 Oct 16 '13 at 8:05

Just have a page-specific $(document).ready().

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your answer. I updated the question. – Strudel Oct 13 '09 at 8:37

Have you tried "@section script"? It will automatic add the codes at the end of the page, thus you can have page specific jQuery scripts.

@section scripts {
<script>
 jQuery(document).ready(function () {
//put your jQuery codes here
});
</script>
}
share|improve this answer
    
The question doesn't mention anything about using ASP.NET, to which the @section would be specific – acjay Nov 20 '12 at 2:31

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