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What are the Differences of Component Diagrams and Deployment Diagrams?

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3 Answers 3

Simply put, a Component diagram shows you how different elements of your system have been grouped together (into assemblies / dlls etc) - and the link between these components. A Deployment diagram takes you one step further and describes on which hardware elements do these components reside.

So for example, if "Utility.dll" is a component and say it is deployed on the Client Machine (hardware). Then, the Component Diagram of this system will show Utility and its link with other components in the system (say.. Customer / SQL Packages). Whereas, the Deployment Diagram will show the hardware configuration - DB Server / Web Server / Client Machine .. and Utility component will be placed into the Client Machine Node.

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A component diagram describes the organization of the physical components in a system. Deployment diagrams depict the physical resources in a system including nodes, components, and connections.See for example here http://vinci.org/uml/

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Component Diagrams are used to diagram the high level components which you will be developing. For example , in my application, i use COM to separate the modules. Each COM object runs in its own executable and is a modeled as a component.

Deployment Diagrams are used to diagram the actual runtime modules which are required to complete the system. This include your modules and any hardware / software which is required to complete your system. In my application, the Deployment diagram will contain the names of all the servers and which modules they will be running.

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