Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have seen this issue around (See links at bottom) but I can't seem to figure out an answer. The problem is that I insert data on a table with an auto increment ID that is a primary key, and another field with a UNIQUE index to avoid duplicates. This works, but when that happens the ID is incremented, although no data has been stored.

Would it be better to remove the auto increment, and handle it myself, selecting the max(ID)?


At the moment I have tried several strategies to make it work as is, including INSERT IGNORE and INSERT ... ON DUPLICATE KEY UPDATE

My latest try was using the following query:

INSERT INTO
    content(field1, field2)
SELECT(:field1, :field2) FROM DUAL
WHERE NOT EXISTS(
    SELECT field1, field2
    FROM content
    WHERE field1 = :field1
)

Related

share|improve this question
    
It would be better just to let it go. Such a "false increment" would not harm anyone. A duplicate of 1000s questions, by the way. –  Your Common Sense Mar 23 '13 at 15:22
    
Such a "false increment" might not be a problem in some cases, but I have a large volume of data to parse, and I insert approximately 1 record for every 30 I don't. The question is more focused on the method to avoid that, the query I am using right now, or handling the auto_increment manually. –  aurbano Mar 23 '13 at 15:28
1  
You should answer you own question (and accepted) instead of updating it with the solution, as suggested in: stackoverflow.com/help/self-answer –  jabaldonedo Feb 25 at 12:31
add comment

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Thanks to this question I have been able to fix that error. The problem was that the SELECT(:field1, :field2) shouldn't have the parenthesis. So the query should be:

INSERT INTO
    content(field1, field2)
SELECT :field1, :field2 FROM DUAL
WHERE NOT EXISTS(
    SELECT field1, field2
    FROM content
    WHERE field1 = :field1
)
share|improve this answer
add comment

You could just do an ORDER BY :)

UPDATE 'table' 
    SET column_id = column_id+1 
    WHERE column_id > [point where you want a un-occupied key] 
    ORDER BY column_id DESC

mysql executes the where and order by first then your update

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.