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It was my understanding that C# conditional operators perform short circuiting. However, my program throws an exception while running this code. Index is equal to -1, so the second condition should never execute, but I get an index out of bounds exception.

if (index != -1 || pieces[index].Type != PieceType.Rook)
{
    allowed = false;
}
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closed as too localized by Anthony Pegram, Iswanto San, Soner Gönül, Gert Arnold, X.L.Ant Mar 23 '13 at 19:17

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1  
You want &&, not || (if (first condition AND second condition) – Anthony Pegram Mar 23 '13 at 15:17
up vote 1 down vote accepted

You have used || so when the first condition fails (index IS -1) the runtime needs to check the second condition before excluding the code from execution and that will trigger the exception,

Instead, you use && (AND) if you want to enter the if only when the two conditions are true.
In this way, as before, the runtime checks the first condition and now getting the false result is enough to decide that there is no need to check the second condition..

if (index != -1 && pieces[index].Type != PieceType.Rook)
{
    allowed = false;
}
share|improve this answer
    
That would not work because then it would always give an index out of bounds. Arrays do not start at -1. – Emrys90 Mar 23 '13 at 15:20
    
@Emrys90, I think you need to refresh on those basics. This is saying if (index NOT EQUAL to -1 AND pieces at index IS NOT rook). If index is -1, it will short circuit and not check the second side, the overall expression is already false. – Anthony Pegram Mar 23 '13 at 15:21
    
That is what I want. I want it to execute the body of the if if the index is not -1 and the element is not a Rook. If the index is -1 I want it to skip the statement. – Emrys90 Mar 23 '13 at 15:25
    
@Emrys90 Think for a second. What happens if the index is -1? The first expression (index != -1) becomes false, and it will short circuit, it will not evaluate the second expression. – antonijn Mar 23 '13 at 15:28
    
@Antonijn Wow. I cannot believe I missed that. My brain must not be awake yet. Thanks. – Emrys90 Mar 23 '13 at 15:32

Replace || with &&

if (index != -1 && pieces[index].Type != PieceType.Rook)

Otherwise the second codition is evaluated if the first is false what you don't want. You want both conditions being true and especially the first one.

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That's because you use OR operator. First condition is false, so second starts evaluating.

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You should have index != 1 && ....

Also, is index < -1 or >= pieces.Length?

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|| will stop evaluating when it finds that something is true. Since index != -1 is false it will evaluate both sides of the expression. If you && it would stop once it finds a false. I would recommend reading up on lazy evulation.

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