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Please help me to find mistakes in this code.I wrote a simple program that adds n strings to trie by Aho-Corasick algorithm,but it doesn't work correctly.It crashes after entering strings.What's wrong with this code?

#include <cstdlib>
#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#define ALPHABET 26

using namespace std;

struct item
{
       int next[ALPHABET];
       int leaf;
       item()
       {
               for (int i = 0; i < ALPHABET; i++)
                       next[i] = -1;
               leaf = 0;
       }
};

vector <item> trie;

int add_string(string &s)
{
       int z = 0;
       item temp;
       for (int i = 0; i < s.length(); i++)
       {
              char c = s[i] - 'a';
              if (trie[z].next[c] == -1)
              {
                     trie[z].next[c] = trie.size();
                     trie.push_back(temp);}
                     z = trie[z].next[c];
              }
              trie[z].leaf = true;
       }
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
       int n;
       cin >> n;
       string s[n];
       for (int i = 0; i < n; i++)
              cin >> s[i];
       for (int i = 0; i < n; i++)
              add_string(s[i]);
       system("PAUSE");
       return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}
share|improve this question
    
have you even tried to debug anything ? –  Stephane Rolland Mar 23 '13 at 15:45
    
How does it crash? What's the error message? –  us2012 Mar 23 '13 at 15:47
1  
Note: string s[n]; makes use of a gcc-ism. In C++ arrays dimensions should be fixed at compile-time (unless dynamically allocated), VLA (Variable-Length Arrays) are strictly C99 and using them in C++ is non-standard (and thus non-portable). The recommendation is to use std::vector<std::string> s(n); instead. –  Matthieu M. Mar 23 '13 at 15:59

1 Answer 1

I don't know anything about the algorithm, so I have no idea if it is running correctly. However, just based on running your code through gdb, you need to start out with at least one element in your trie vector. You could do that by writing

vector <item> trie(1);

where the 1 signifies how many elements the vector should start out with. With that change, the code runs fine (but I don't know if it is running the algorithm correctly).

share|improve this answer
    
I think you are right.I will add search function to check if it works. –  Murad Talibov Mar 23 '13 at 16:15

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