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I'd like to have a default functor for a functor parameter in the constructor of a class. As a minimal example I came up with a class which should server as a filter, which filters elements of type T iif a filter function returns true. The filter function should be provided in the constructor, defaulting to an "accept all" filter function:

template<class T>
class Filter
{
public:
    typedef std::function<bool(const T&)> FilterFunc;

    Filter(const FilterFunc & f = [](const T&){ return true; }) :
        f(f)
    {
    }

private:
    FilterFunc f;
};

I instantiate the template class like the following:

int main() {
    Filter<int> someInstance;  // No filter function provided    (<-- line 19)
}

However, gcc 4.7 doesn't seem to like this piece of code:

prog.cpp: In constructor ‘Filter<T>::Filter(const FilterFunc&) [with T = int; Filter<T>::FilterFunc = std::function<bool(const int&)>]’:
prog.cpp:19:17: internal compiler error: in tsubst_copy, at cp/pt.c:12141
Please submit a full bug report,
with preprocessed source if appropriate.
See <file:///usr/share/doc/gcc-4.7/README.Bugs> for instructions.
Preprocessed source stored into /home/g9i3n9/cc82xcqE.out file, please attach this to your bugreport.

What's wrong? Is my code standard conformant (so GCC is really buggy here or hasn't implemented this) or am I doing something wrong?

As a workaround, I currently use a default-constructed std::function and only call it (where I want to call it) if it was set:

    Filter(const FilterFunc & f = FilterFunc) :
        f(f)
    {
    }

    // When using it:
    void process() {
        if (!f || f(someItem)) {    // <-- workaround
        }
    }
share|improve this question
    
Seems like a bug. Over 4.8 it compiles fine: liveworkspace.org/code/TFMDc$0 – SomeWittyUsername Mar 23 '13 at 17:23
    
Works with Clang 3.2 too. – ipc Mar 23 '13 at 17:23
    
Thank you both for testing other compilers. I added a workaround in the question, which is only acceptable for some cases like mine, but there might be other cases in which you can't use this. – leemes Mar 23 '13 at 17:25
3  
As a general tip: If the compiler ever says "internal compiler error", it's a bug, no questions asked. – Xeo Mar 23 '13 at 17:26
1  
@leemes: when the compiler says "please file a bug report", I would say it's a pretty damn good clue that it's a compiler bug. Of course, this says nothing about whether the code is correct or not (though people often distinguish crash-on-valid and crash-on-invalid, the former being more serious); it just says there is a compiler bug. – Matthieu M. Mar 23 '13 at 18:53
up vote 3 down vote accepted

This is a bug: the compiler crashed or a fatal internal error occurred while processing the source code, and the message itself is kindly inviting you to treat the error as such:

"Please submit a full bug report, with preprocessed source if appropriate."

Here is another possible workaround:

template<class T>
class Filter
{
public:
    typedef std::function<bool(const T&)> FilterFunc;

    Filter() { }
    Filter(FilterFunc const& f) : f(f) { }

private:
    FilterFunc f = [](const T&){ return true; };
};

As a further alternative, GCC supports delegating constructors, which you may want to consider:

#include <functional>

template<class T>
class Filter
{
public:
    typedef std::function<bool(const T&)> FilterFunc;

    Filter() : Filter([](const T&){ return true; }) { }
    Filter(FilterFunc const& f) : f(f) { }

private:
    FilterFunc f;
};
share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks for the alternative workaround. Regarding the bug: I as a user don't know if the bug was because my code was wrong and the error message could not be generated (my fault) or if my code was ok and the compiler failed to compile it (its fault). Of course, the latter is 99% likely the case. ;) But as I'm not perfect, I search for errors in my code in the first place. – leemes Mar 23 '13 at 17:28
    
@leemes: It is definitely not your code in this case. There's nothing wrong with it ;) – Andy Prowl Mar 23 '13 at 17:29
    
@leemes the first case is also a compiler bug – SomeWittyUsername Mar 23 '13 at 17:30
    
@icepack That's what I said. But in the first case, my code is wrong in the sense that I made a mistake, and the compiler fails reporting the correct error message to me. In the second case I also have to change my code, but not because it's wrong, but because my compiler can't process it. – leemes Mar 23 '13 at 17:32

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