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When i use

alert(j(this).attr("id"));

I can see the pop up window shows up _denominations[3].id.denominationId

but when i call

alert(j('#_denominations[3].id.denominationId').attr("id"));

The pop up window shows me 'undefined', the actual html DOM is looks like this:

<div class="form-field">
    <select id="_denominations[3].id.denominationId" class="removableDenom" name="denominations[3].id.denominationId">
</div>

So what chance could possibly make undefined pop up happens

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marked as duplicate by Juhana, Jared Farrish, Felix Kling, Richard Brown, Graviton Mar 27 '13 at 6:15

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
My initial thought is you can't have those periods and brackets. Maybe. –  Jared Farrish Mar 23 '13 at 17:51
    
I thought something about this was familiar –  Jared Farrish Mar 23 '13 at 17:54
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5 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Try escaping the periods and brackets in the ID value itself. So your value:

'#_denominations[3].id.denominationId'

Becomes

'#_denominations\\[3\\]\\.id\\.denominationId'

It's likely that jQuery is confusing these with classes and attribute selectors.

Example: http://jsfiddle.net/jonathansampson/ZUMna/

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You need double-slashes (\\.) when escaping selectors. –  Juhana Mar 23 '13 at 17:53
1  
@Juhana, Yeah, that was the answer to my similar question too. –  Jared Farrish Mar 23 '13 at 17:55
    
@Jonathan Sampson Thank you, but can j('#'+obj.attr('id')).attr('id') work without escaping? –  Dreamer Mar 23 '13 at 18:00
    
@Dreamer Yes, but what's the point? obj is already the object you want, why select it again? –  Juhana Mar 23 '13 at 18:03
    
@Jonathan Sampson I try to extract the index of one objects id and find another object by using the index and the id pattern. –  Dreamer Mar 23 '13 at 18:08
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you need to escape the special characters in ID..that is [,],..... since jquery takes [] as attribute selector and . as class selector..

try this

alert(j('#_denominations\\[3\\]\\.id\\.denominationId').attr("id"));
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3  
Except you need to escape twice, once for the JS string and once for jQuery selector. –  Spencer Lockhart Mar 23 '13 at 17:54
1  
oooo yes.. thank u .. :).. updated.. –  bipen Mar 23 '13 at 17:56
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jQuery is assuming those [] are an attribute selector, not part of the ID; special characters must be escaped. [] aren't actually allowed in HTML ids before HTML5, which could cause you other problems down the road - I've seen document.getElementById fail because the ID started with a number, for example, even with an HTML5 doctype, in an older browser.

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1  
Brackets are allowed in HTML5 (you linked to HTML4 spec) and the periods must also be escaped. –  Juhana Mar 23 '13 at 17:59
1  
No reason for a negative on this, you are correct. –  Spencer Lockhart Mar 23 '13 at 17:59
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another shortcut .

j('[id="_denominations[3].id.denominationId"]')
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1  
This will work, but it's very slow compared to straight-up id selection because jQuery has to traverse every element on the page instead of using the native getElementById(). –  Juhana Mar 23 '13 at 18:07
    
Functional, but it defeats Sizzle's optimization of ID lookups, so it become a performance issue on large pages. –  MattW Mar 23 '13 at 18:09
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I would strongly recommend you simplify your id and name attributes.

The following is from the HTML4 documentation and may differ for different versions of HTML:
http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/types.html#type-id

ID and NAME tokens must begin with a letter ([A-Za-z]) and may be followed by any number of letters, digits ([0-9]), hyphens ("-"), underscores ("_"), colons (":"), and periods (".").

Personally I only ever use alphanumeric, hyphen and underscore characters. I try to keep them short and semantic. This makes it easier not only for myself, but any other developers who might work with my code.

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That's HTML 4. Brackets are allowed in HTML5. Anyway this doesn't really answer the question. –  Juhana Mar 23 '13 at 18:08
1  
It may not answer the question. However if the code was written to good standard in the first place the question would not have needed asking. –  diggersworld Mar 23 '13 at 18:10
    
@diggersworld Thank you for the suggestion, I appreciate it. –  Dreamer Mar 23 '13 at 18:20
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